Stock Analysis

L.B. Foster (NASDAQ:FSTR) Takes On Some Risk With Its Use Of Debt

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NasdaqGS:FSTR
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Legendary fund manager Li Lu (who Charlie Munger backed) once said, 'The biggest investment risk is not the volatility of prices, but whether you will suffer a permanent loss of capital.' When we think about how risky a company is, we always like to look at its use of debt, since debt overload can lead to ruin. Importantly, L.B. Foster Company (NASDAQ:FSTR) does carry debt. But should shareholders be worried about its use of debt?

When Is Debt Dangerous?

Debt is a tool to help businesses grow, but if a business is incapable of paying off its lenders, then it exists at their mercy. In the worst case scenario, a company can go bankrupt if it cannot pay its creditors. However, a more frequent (but still costly) occurrence is where a company must issue shares at bargain-basement prices, permanently diluting shareholders, just to shore up its balance sheet. Of course, plenty of companies use debt to fund growth, without any negative consequences. When we think about a company's use of debt, we first look at cash and debt together.

See our latest analysis for L.B. Foster

What Is L.B. Foster's Net Debt?

You can click the graphic below for the historical numbers, but it shows that L.B. Foster had US$37.7m of debt in June 2021, down from US$56.8m, one year before. However, it does have US$4.14m in cash offsetting this, leading to net debt of about US$33.5m.

debt-equity-history-analysis
NasdaqGS:FSTR Debt to Equity History September 10th 2021

How Strong Is L.B. Foster's Balance Sheet?

Zooming in on the latest balance sheet data, we can see that L.B. Foster had liabilities of US$112.0m due within 12 months and liabilities of US$87.1m due beyond that. On the other hand, it had cash of US$4.14m and US$78.4m worth of receivables due within a year. So its liabilities total US$116.6m more than the combination of its cash and short-term receivables.

This deficit is considerable relative to its market capitalization of US$189.2m, so it does suggest shareholders should keep an eye on L.B. Foster's use of debt. Should its lenders demand that it shore up the balance sheet, shareholders would likely face severe dilution.

We measure a company's debt load relative to its earnings power by looking at its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) and by calculating how easily its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) cover its interest expense (interest cover). This way, we consider both the absolute quantum of the debt, as well as the interest rates paid on it.

Looking at its net debt to EBITDA of 1.4 and interest cover of 3.0 times, it seems to us that L.B. Foster is probably using debt in a pretty reasonable way. But the interest payments are certainly sufficient to have us thinking about how affordable its debt is. Importantly, L.B. Foster's EBIT fell a jaw-dropping 45% in the last twelve months. If that earnings trend continues then paying off its debt will be about as easy as herding cats on to a roller coaster. When analysing debt levels, the balance sheet is the obvious place to start. But it is future earnings, more than anything, that will determine L.B. Foster's ability to maintain a healthy balance sheet going forward. So if you're focused on the future you can check out this free report showing analyst profit forecasts.

Finally, while the tax-man may adore accounting profits, lenders only accept cold hard cash. So we clearly need to look at whether that EBIT is leading to corresponding free cash flow. During the last three years, L.B. Foster produced sturdy free cash flow equating to 78% of its EBIT, about what we'd expect. This cold hard cash means it can reduce its debt when it wants to.

Our View

L.B. Foster's EBIT growth rate was a real negative on this analysis, although the other factors we considered cast it in a significantly better light. In particular, its conversion of EBIT to free cash flow was re-invigorating. When we consider all the factors discussed, it seems to us that L.B. Foster is taking some risks with its use of debt. While that debt can boost returns, we think the company has enough leverage now. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when you are analysing debt. However, not all investment risk resides within the balance sheet - far from it. For example L.B. Foster has 2 warning signs (and 1 which is a bit unpleasant) we think you should know about.

When all is said and done, sometimes its easier to focus on companies that don't even need debt. Readers can access a list of growth stocks with zero net debt 100% free, right now.

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