Stock Analysis

These 4 Measures Indicate That Norbit (OB:NORBT) Is Using Debt Reasonably Well

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OB:NORBT
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Legendary fund manager Li Lu (who Charlie Munger backed) once said, 'The biggest investment risk is not the volatility of prices, but whether you will suffer a permanent loss of capital.' It's only natural to consider a company's balance sheet when you examine how risky it is, since debt is often involved when a business collapses. We can see that Norbit ASA (OB:NORBT) does use debt in its business. But should shareholders be worried about its use of debt?

What Risk Does Debt Bring?

Generally speaking, debt only becomes a real problem when a company can't easily pay it off, either by raising capital or with its own cash flow. Part and parcel of capitalism is the process of 'creative destruction' where failed businesses are mercilessly liquidated by their bankers. However, a more frequent (but still costly) occurrence is where a company must issue shares at bargain-basement prices, permanently diluting shareholders, just to shore up its balance sheet. Of course, debt can be an important tool in businesses, particularly capital heavy businesses. When we examine debt levels, we first consider both cash and debt levels, together.

Our analysis indicates that NORBT is potentially undervalued!

How Much Debt Does Norbit Carry?

The image below, which you can click on for greater detail, shows that at September 2022 Norbit had debt of kr307.4m, up from kr272.6m in one year. However, because it has a cash reserve of kr30.6m, its net debt is less, at about kr276.8m.

debt-equity-history-analysis
OB:NORBT Debt to Equity History December 8th 2022

How Strong Is Norbit's Balance Sheet?

We can see from the most recent balance sheet that Norbit had liabilities of kr389.9m falling due within a year, and liabilities of kr175.4m due beyond that. Offsetting these obligations, it had cash of kr30.6m as well as receivables valued at kr157.1m due within 12 months. So its liabilities outweigh the sum of its cash and (near-term) receivables by kr377.6m.

While this might seem like a lot, it is not so bad since Norbit has a market capitalization of kr1.53b, and so it could probably strengthen its balance sheet by raising capital if it needed to. But it's clear that we should definitely closely examine whether it can manage its debt without dilution.

We use two main ratios to inform us about debt levels relative to earnings. The first is net debt divided by earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA), while the second is how many times its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) covers its interest expense (or its interest cover, for short). The advantage of this approach is that we take into account both the absolute quantum of debt (with net debt to EBITDA) and the actual interest expenses associated with that debt (with its interest cover ratio).

Norbit's net debt of 1.7 times EBITDA suggests graceful use of debt. And the alluring interest cover (EBIT of 9.3 times interest expense) certainly does not do anything to dispel this impression. Pleasingly, Norbit is growing its EBIT faster than former Australian PM Bob Hawke downs a yard glass, boasting a 129% gain in the last twelve months. When analysing debt levels, the balance sheet is the obvious place to start. But it is future earnings, more than anything, that will determine Norbit's ability to maintain a healthy balance sheet going forward. So if you're focused on the future you can check out this free report showing analyst profit forecasts.

Finally, while the tax-man may adore accounting profits, lenders only accept cold hard cash. So the logical step is to look at the proportion of that EBIT that is matched by actual free cash flow. Considering the last three years, Norbit actually recorded a cash outflow, overall. Debt is far more risky for companies with unreliable free cash flow, so shareholders should be hoping that the past expenditure will produce free cash flow in the future.

Our View

On our analysis Norbit's EBIT growth rate should signal that it won't have too much trouble with its debt. But the other factors we noted above weren't so encouraging. To be specific, it seems about as good at converting EBIT to free cash flow as wet socks are at keeping your feet warm. Considering this range of data points, we think Norbit is in a good position to manage its debt levels. Having said that, the load is sufficiently heavy that we would recommend any shareholders keep a close eye on it. There's no doubt that we learn most about debt from the balance sheet. However, not all investment risk resides within the balance sheet - far from it. To that end, you should be aware of the 1 warning sign we've spotted with Norbit .

When all is said and done, sometimes its easier to focus on companies that don't even need debt. Readers can access a list of growth stocks with zero net debt 100% free, right now.

Valuation is complex, but we're helping make it simple.

Find out whether Norbit is potentially over or undervalued by checking out our comprehensive analysis, which includes fair value estimates, risks and warnings, dividends, insider transactions and financial health.

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