Does Willbes (KRX:008600) Have A Healthy Balance Sheet?

May 09, 2021
  •  Updated
November 30, 2022
KOSE:A008600
Source: Shutterstock

Some say volatility, rather than debt, is the best way to think about risk as an investor, but Warren Buffett famously said that 'Volatility is far from synonymous with risk.' So it seems the smart money knows that debt - which is usually involved in bankruptcies - is a very important factor, when you assess how risky a company is. As with many other companies The Willbes & CO., Ltd. (KRX:008600) makes use of debt. But the more important question is: how much risk is that debt creating?

Why Does Debt Bring Risk?

Generally speaking, debt only becomes a real problem when a company can't easily pay it off, either by raising capital or with its own cash flow. Ultimately, if the company can't fulfill its legal obligations to repay debt, shareholders could walk away with nothing. While that is not too common, we often do see indebted companies permanently diluting shareholders because lenders force them to raise capital at a distressed price. Of course, plenty of companies use debt to fund growth, without any negative consequences. The first step when considering a company's debt levels is to consider its cash and debt together.

Check out our latest analysis for Willbes

What Is Willbes's Debt?

You can click the graphic below for the historical numbers, but it shows that as of December 2020 Willbes had ₩128.2b of debt, an increase on ₩121.5b, over one year. However, because it has a cash reserve of ₩19.7b, its net debt is less, at about ₩108.5b.

debt-equity-history-analysis
KOSE:A008600 Debt to Equity History May 9th 2021

How Strong Is Willbes' Balance Sheet?

According to the last reported balance sheet, Willbes had liabilities of ₩163.0b due within 12 months, and liabilities of ₩22.7b due beyond 12 months. Offsetting this, it had ₩19.7b in cash and ₩67.1b in receivables that were due within 12 months. So its liabilities total ₩98.8b more than the combination of its cash and short-term receivables.

This deficit is considerable relative to its market capitalization of ₩140.3b, so it does suggest shareholders should keep an eye on Willbes' use of debt. This suggests shareholders would be heavily diluted if the company needed to shore up its balance sheet in a hurry.

In order to size up a company's debt relative to its earnings, we calculate its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) and its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) divided by its interest expense (its interest cover). Thus we consider debt relative to earnings both with and without depreciation and amortization expenses.

While Willbes's debt to EBITDA ratio (4.7) suggests that it uses some debt, its interest cover is very weak, at 0.37, suggesting high leverage. It seems that the business incurs large depreciation and amortisation charges, so maybe its debt load is heavier than it would first appear, since EBITDA is arguably a generous measure of earnings. So shareholders should probably be aware that interest expenses appear to have really impacted the business lately. One redeeming factor for Willbes is that it turned last year's EBIT loss into a gain of ₩2.3b, over the last twelve months. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when you are analysing debt. But you can't view debt in total isolation; since Willbes will need earnings to service that debt. So if you're keen to discover more about its earnings, it might be worth checking out this graph of its long term earnings trend.

Finally, a business needs free cash flow to pay off debt; accounting profits just don't cut it. So it's worth checking how much of the earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) is backed by free cash flow. Over the last year, Willbes saw substantial negative free cash flow, in total. While that may be a result of expenditure for growth, it does make the debt far more risky.

Our View

On the face of it, Willbes's interest cover left us tentative about the stock, and its conversion of EBIT to free cash flow was no more enticing than the one empty restaurant on the busiest night of the year. Having said that, its ability to grow its EBIT isn't such a worry. We're quite clear that we consider Willbes to be really rather risky, as a result of its balance sheet health. For this reason we're pretty cautious about the stock, and we think shareholders should keep a close eye on its liquidity. When analysing debt levels, the balance sheet is the obvious place to start. But ultimately, every company can contain risks that exist outside of the balance sheet. For example, we've discovered 2 warning signs for Willbes (1 can't be ignored!) that you should be aware of before investing here.

If you're interested in investing in businesses that can grow profits without the burden of debt, then check out this free list of growing businesses that have net cash on the balance sheet.

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