Is Jiangxi Copper (HKG:358) Using Too Much Debt?

By
Simply Wall St
Published
March 17, 2022
SEHK:358
Source: Shutterstock

Warren Buffett famously said, 'Volatility is far from synonymous with risk.' When we think about how risky a company is, we always like to look at its use of debt, since debt overload can lead to ruin. We note that Jiangxi Copper Company Limited (HKG:358) does have debt on its balance sheet. But should shareholders be worried about its use of debt?

What Risk Does Debt Bring?

Debt assists a business until the business has trouble paying it off, either with new capital or with free cash flow. Part and parcel of capitalism is the process of 'creative destruction' where failed businesses are mercilessly liquidated by their bankers. However, a more frequent (but still costly) occurrence is where a company must issue shares at bargain-basement prices, permanently diluting shareholders, just to shore up its balance sheet. By replacing dilution, though, debt can be an extremely good tool for businesses that need capital to invest in growth at high rates of return. The first thing to do when considering how much debt a business uses is to look at its cash and debt together.

Check out our latest analysis for Jiangxi Copper

How Much Debt Does Jiangxi Copper Carry?

You can click the graphic below for the historical numbers, but it shows that as of September 2021 Jiangxi Copper had CN¥65.6b of debt, an increase on CN¥59.5b, over one year. However, it does have CN¥50.7b in cash offsetting this, leading to net debt of about CN¥14.9b.

debt-equity-history-analysis
SEHK:358 Debt to Equity History March 17th 2022

How Healthy Is Jiangxi Copper's Balance Sheet?

We can see from the most recent balance sheet that Jiangxi Copper had liabilities of CN¥72.3b falling due within a year, and liabilities of CN¥22.3b due beyond that. On the other hand, it had cash of CN¥50.7b and CN¥12.5b worth of receivables due within a year. So its liabilities outweigh the sum of its cash and (near-term) receivables by CN¥31.4b.

This is a mountain of leverage relative to its market capitalization of CN¥51.9b. This suggests shareholders would be heavily diluted if the company needed to shore up its balance sheet in a hurry.

In order to size up a company's debt relative to its earnings, we calculate its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) and its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) divided by its interest expense (its interest cover). Thus we consider debt relative to earnings both with and without depreciation and amortization expenses.

Jiangxi Copper has net debt of just 0.98 times EBITDA, indicating that it is certainly not a reckless borrower. And this view is supported by the solid interest coverage, with EBIT coming in at 8.2 times the interest expense over the last year. Better yet, Jiangxi Copper grew its EBIT by 118% last year, which is an impressive improvement. That boost will make it even easier to pay down debt going forward. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when you are analysing debt. But it is future earnings, more than anything, that will determine Jiangxi Copper's ability to maintain a healthy balance sheet going forward. So if you're focused on the future you can check out this free report showing analyst profit forecasts.

Finally, a company can only pay off debt with cold hard cash, not accounting profits. So we always check how much of that EBIT is translated into free cash flow. Over the most recent three years, Jiangxi Copper recorded free cash flow worth 57% of its EBIT, which is around normal, given free cash flow excludes interest and tax. This free cash flow puts the company in a good position to pay down debt, when appropriate.

Our View

The good news is that Jiangxi Copper's demonstrated ability to grow its EBIT delights us like a fluffy puppy does a toddler. But, on a more sombre note, we are a little concerned by its level of total liabilities. Looking at all the aforementioned factors together, it strikes us that Jiangxi Copper can handle its debt fairly comfortably. On the plus side, this leverage can boost shareholder returns, but the potential downside is more risk of loss, so it's worth monitoring the balance sheet. When analysing debt levels, the balance sheet is the obvious place to start. But ultimately, every company can contain risks that exist outside of the balance sheet. These risks can be hard to spot. Every company has them, and we've spotted 3 warning signs for Jiangxi Copper (of which 1 can't be ignored!) you should know about.

If you're interested in investing in businesses that can grow profits without the burden of debt, then check out this free list of growing businesses that have net cash on the balance sheet.

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