These 4 Measures Indicate That Endesa (BME:ELE) Is Using Debt Extensively

March 07, 2022
  •  Updated
June 19, 2022
BME:ELE
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Legendary fund manager Li Lu (who Charlie Munger backed) once said, 'The biggest investment risk is not the volatility of prices, but whether you will suffer a permanent loss of capital.' So it seems the smart money knows that debt - which is usually involved in bankruptcies - is a very important factor, when you assess how risky a company is. As with many other companies Endesa, S.A. (BME:ELE) makes use of debt. But the more important question is: how much risk is that debt creating?

Why Does Debt Bring Risk?

Debt and other liabilities become risky for a business when it cannot easily fulfill those obligations, either with free cash flow or by raising capital at an attractive price. Ultimately, if the company can't fulfill its legal obligations to repay debt, shareholders could walk away with nothing. However, a more common (but still painful) scenario is that it has to raise new equity capital at a low price, thus permanently diluting shareholders. Of course, plenty of companies use debt to fund growth, without any negative consequences. When we think about a company's use of debt, we first look at cash and debt together.

View our latest analysis for Endesa

What Is Endesa's Net Debt?

As you can see below, at the end of December 2021, Endesa had €9.45b of debt, up from €6.51b a year ago. Click the image for more detail. However, it also had €1.59b in cash, and so its net debt is €7.86b.

debt-equity-history-analysis
BME:ELE Debt to Equity History March 7th 2022

How Healthy Is Endesa's Balance Sheet?

According to the last reported balance sheet, Endesa had liabilities of €15.8b due within 12 months, and liabilities of €18.6b due beyond 12 months. Offsetting this, it had €1.59b in cash and €6.32b in receivables that were due within 12 months. So its liabilities total €26.5b more than the combination of its cash and short-term receivables.

When you consider that this deficiency exceeds the company's huge €18.9b market capitalization, you might well be inclined to review the balance sheet intently. In the scenario where the company had to clean up its balance sheet quickly, it seems likely shareholders would suffer extensive dilution.

In order to size up a company's debt relative to its earnings, we calculate its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) and its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) divided by its interest expense (its interest cover). Thus we consider debt relative to earnings both with and without depreciation and amortization expenses.

Endesa's net debt to EBITDA ratio of about 2.1 suggests only moderate use of debt. And its commanding EBIT of 158 times its interest expense, implies the debt load is as light as a peacock feather. Unfortunately, Endesa's EBIT flopped 16% over the last four quarters. If that sort of decline is not arrested, then the managing its debt will be harder than selling broccoli flavoured ice-cream for a premium. When analysing debt levels, the balance sheet is the obvious place to start. But it is future earnings, more than anything, that will determine Endesa's ability to maintain a healthy balance sheet going forward. So if you want to see what the professionals think, you might find this free report on analyst profit forecasts to be interesting.

Finally, a business needs free cash flow to pay off debt; accounting profits just don't cut it. So the logical step is to look at the proportion of that EBIT that is matched by actual free cash flow. Looking at the most recent three years, Endesa recorded free cash flow of 44% of its EBIT, which is weaker than we'd expect. That's not great, when it comes to paying down debt.

Our View

On the face of it, Endesa's EBIT growth rate left us tentative about the stock, and its level of total liabilities was no more enticing than the one empty restaurant on the busiest night of the year. But at least it's pretty decent at covering its interest expense with its EBIT; that's encouraging. We should also note that Electric Utilities industry companies like Endesa commonly do use debt without problems. Looking at the bigger picture, it seems clear to us that Endesa's use of debt is creating risks for the company. If everything goes well that may pay off but the downside of this debt is a greater risk of permanent losses. There's no doubt that we learn most about debt from the balance sheet. But ultimately, every company can contain risks that exist outside of the balance sheet. We've identified 3 warning signs with Endesa , and understanding them should be part of your investment process.

If, after all that, you're more interested in a fast growing company with a rock-solid balance sheet, then check out our list of net cash growth stocks without delay.

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