These 4 Measures Indicate That Mainova (FRA:MNV6) Is Using Debt Reasonably Well

By
Simply Wall St
Published
May 10, 2022
DB:MNV6
Source: Shutterstock

The external fund manager backed by Berkshire Hathaway's Charlie Munger, Li Lu, makes no bones about it when he says 'The biggest investment risk is not the volatility of prices, but whether you will suffer a permanent loss of capital.' When we think about how risky a company is, we always like to look at its use of debt, since debt overload can lead to ruin. We note that Mainova AG (FRA:MNV6) does have debt on its balance sheet. But the more important question is: how much risk is that debt creating?

What Risk Does Debt Bring?

Debt assists a business until the business has trouble paying it off, either with new capital or with free cash flow. Part and parcel of capitalism is the process of 'creative destruction' where failed businesses are mercilessly liquidated by their bankers. However, a more usual (but still expensive) situation is where a company must dilute shareholders at a cheap share price simply to get debt under control. Of course, the upside of debt is that it often represents cheap capital, especially when it replaces dilution in a company with the ability to reinvest at high rates of return. When we examine debt levels, we first consider both cash and debt levels, together.

Check out our latest analysis for Mainova

What Is Mainova's Debt?

As you can see below, at the end of December 2021, Mainova had €514.4m of debt, up from €473.3m a year ago. Click the image for more detail. However, it does have €12.2m in cash offsetting this, leading to net debt of about €502.2m.

debt-equity-history-analysis
DB:MNV6 Debt to Equity History May 10th 2022

A Look At Mainova's Liabilities

We can see from the most recent balance sheet that Mainova had liabilities of €1.15b falling due within a year, and liabilities of €3.56b due beyond that. Offsetting this, it had €12.2m in cash and €497.1m in receivables that were due within 12 months. So its liabilities total €4.19b more than the combination of its cash and short-term receivables.

Given this deficit is actually higher than the company's market capitalization of €3.42b, we think shareholders really should watch Mainova's debt levels, like a parent watching their child ride a bike for the first time. Hypothetically, extremely heavy dilution would be required if the company were forced to pay down its liabilities by raising capital at the current share price.

We measure a company's debt load relative to its earnings power by looking at its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) and by calculating how easily its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) cover its interest expense (interest cover). This way, we consider both the absolute quantum of the debt, as well as the interest rates paid on it.

Mainova has a low net debt to EBITDA ratio of only 0.99. And its EBIT covers its interest expense a whopping 39.5 times over. So you could argue it is no more threatened by its debt than an elephant is by a mouse. Even more impressive was the fact that Mainova grew its EBIT by 234% over twelve months. If maintained that growth will make the debt even more manageable in the years ahead. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when you are analysing debt. But it is Mainova's earnings that will influence how the balance sheet holds up in the future. So when considering debt, it's definitely worth looking at the earnings trend. Click here for an interactive snapshot.

Finally, a company can only pay off debt with cold hard cash, not accounting profits. So the logical step is to look at the proportion of that EBIT that is matched by actual free cash flow. Looking at the most recent three years, Mainova recorded free cash flow of 45% of its EBIT, which is weaker than we'd expect. That weak cash conversion makes it more difficult to handle indebtedness.

Our View

Mainova's interest cover was a real positive on this analysis, as was its EBIT growth rate. But truth be told its level of total liabilities had us nibbling our nails. It's also worth noting that Mainova is in the Integrated Utilities industry, which is often considered to be quite defensive. Considering this range of data points, we think Mainova is in a good position to manage its debt levels. But a word of caution: we think debt levels are high enough to justify ongoing monitoring. There's no doubt that we learn most about debt from the balance sheet. However, not all investment risk resides within the balance sheet - far from it. We've identified 1 warning sign with Mainova , and understanding them should be part of your investment process.

When all is said and done, sometimes its easier to focus on companies that don't even need debt. Readers can access a list of growth stocks with zero net debt 100% free, right now.

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