Stock Analysis

We Think Titan Mining (TSE:TI) Can Stay On Top Of Its Debt

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TSX:TI
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Some say volatility, rather than debt, is the best way to think about risk as an investor, but Warren Buffett famously said that 'Volatility is far from synonymous with risk.' So it might be obvious that you need to consider debt, when you think about how risky any given stock is, because too much debt can sink a company. As with many other companies Titan Mining Corporation (TSE:TI) makes use of debt. But the real question is whether this debt is making the company risky.

What Risk Does Debt Bring?

Debt assists a business until the business has trouble paying it off, either with new capital or with free cash flow. In the worst case scenario, a company can go bankrupt if it cannot pay its creditors. However, a more common (but still painful) scenario is that it has to raise new equity capital at a low price, thus permanently diluting shareholders. By replacing dilution, though, debt can be an extremely good tool for businesses that need capital to invest in growth at high rates of return. When we think about a company's use of debt, we first look at cash and debt together.

Check out our latest analysis for Titan Mining

What Is Titan Mining's Net Debt?

As you can see below, Titan Mining had US$37.0m of debt, at June 2022, which is about the same as the year before. You can click the chart for greater detail. However, it does have US$11.0m in cash offsetting this, leading to net debt of about US$26.0m.

debt-equity-history-analysis
TSX:TI Debt to Equity History September 13th 2022

How Strong Is Titan Mining's Balance Sheet?

Zooming in on the latest balance sheet data, we can see that Titan Mining had liabilities of US$5.63m due within 12 months and liabilities of US$53.5m due beyond that. Offsetting these obligations, it had cash of US$11.0m as well as receivables valued at US$2.83m due within 12 months. So it has liabilities totalling US$45.2m more than its cash and near-term receivables, combined.

This is a mountain of leverage relative to its market capitalization of US$61.0m. Should its lenders demand that it shore up the balance sheet, shareholders would likely face severe dilution.

We use two main ratios to inform us about debt levels relative to earnings. The first is net debt divided by earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA), while the second is how many times its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) covers its interest expense (or its interest cover, for short). This way, we consider both the absolute quantum of the debt, as well as the interest rates paid on it.

While Titan Mining's low debt to EBITDA ratio of 1.2 suggests only modest use of debt, the fact that EBIT only covered the interest expense by 3.4 times last year does give us pause. But the interest payments are certainly sufficient to have us thinking about how affordable its debt is. Notably, Titan Mining made a loss at the EBIT level, last year, but improved that to positive EBIT of US$9.7m in the last twelve months. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when you are analysing debt. But you can't view debt in total isolation; since Titan Mining will need earnings to service that debt. So when considering debt, it's definitely worth looking at the earnings trend. Click here for an interactive snapshot.

Finally, a company can only pay off debt with cold hard cash, not accounting profits. So it's worth checking how much of the earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) is backed by free cash flow. Happily for any shareholders, Titan Mining actually produced more free cash flow than EBIT over the last year. That sort of strong cash conversion gets us as excited as the crowd when the beat drops at a Daft Punk concert.

Our View

On our analysis Titan Mining's conversion of EBIT to free cash flow should signal that it won't have too much trouble with its debt. However, our other observations weren't so heartening. For instance it seems like it has to struggle a bit to cover its interest expense with its EBIT. Looking at all this data makes us feel a little cautious about Titan Mining's debt levels. While we appreciate debt can enhance returns on equity, we'd suggest that shareholders keep close watch on its debt levels, lest they increase. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when you are analysing debt. But ultimately, every company can contain risks that exist outside of the balance sheet. Be aware that Titan Mining is showing 3 warning signs in our investment analysis , you should know about...

If you're interested in investing in businesses that can grow profits without the burden of debt, then check out this free list of growing businesses that have net cash on the balance sheet.

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About TSX:TI

Titan Mining

Titan Mining Corporation, a natural resources company, acquires, explores, and develops mineral properties.

The Snowflake is a visual investment summary with the score of each axis being calculated by 6 checks in 5 areas.

Analysis AreaScore (0-6)
Valuation2
Future Growth0
Past Performance3
Financial Health2
Dividends0

Read more about these checks in the individual report sections or in our analysis model.

Acceptable track record and slightly overvalued.