Does Hulisani (JSE:HUL) Have A Healthy Balance Sheet?

By
Simply Wall St
Published
May 25, 2021
JSE:HUL
Source: Shutterstock

David Iben put it well when he said, 'Volatility is not a risk we care about. What we care about is avoiding the permanent loss of capital.' It's only natural to consider a company's balance sheet when you examine how risky it is, since debt is often involved when a business collapses. We can see that Hulisani Limited (JSE:HUL) does use debt in its business. But the more important question is: how much risk is that debt creating?

When Is Debt A Problem?

Generally speaking, debt only becomes a real problem when a company can't easily pay it off, either by raising capital or with its own cash flow. If things get really bad, the lenders can take control of the business. However, a more frequent (but still costly) occurrence is where a company must issue shares at bargain-basement prices, permanently diluting shareholders, just to shore up its balance sheet. Having said that, the most common situation is where a company manages its debt reasonably well - and to its own advantage. The first thing to do when considering how much debt a business uses is to look at its cash and debt together.

Check out our latest analysis for Hulisani

How Much Debt Does Hulisani Carry?

The image below, which you can click on for greater detail, shows that Hulisani had debt of R111.4m at the end of February 2021, a reduction from R124.9m over a year. However, it also had R26.9m in cash, and so its net debt is R84.5m.

debt-equity-history-analysis
JSE:HUL Debt to Equity History May 26th 2021

A Look At Hulisani's Liabilities

According to the last reported balance sheet, Hulisani had liabilities of R21.3m due within 12 months, and liabilities of R146.9m due beyond 12 months. Offsetting these obligations, it had cash of R26.9m as well as receivables valued at R10.9m due within 12 months. So its liabilities total R130.3m more than the combination of its cash and short-term receivables.

The deficiency here weighs heavily on the R75.0m company itself, as if a child were struggling under the weight of an enormous back-pack full of books, his sports gear, and a trumpet. So we'd watch its balance sheet closely, without a doubt. At the end of the day, Hulisani would probably need a major re-capitalization if its creditors were to demand repayment.

In order to size up a company's debt relative to its earnings, we calculate its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) and its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) divided by its interest expense (its interest cover). The advantage of this approach is that we take into account both the absolute quantum of debt (with net debt to EBITDA) and the actual interest expenses associated with that debt (with its interest cover ratio).

While Hulisani's debt to EBITDA ratio (3.1) suggests that it uses some debt, its interest cover is very weak, at 0.91, suggesting high leverage. In large part that's due to the company's significant depreciation and amortisation charges, which arguably mean its EBITDA is a very generous measure of earnings, and its debt may be more of a burden than it first appears. So shareholders should probably be aware that interest expenses appear to have really impacted the business lately. One redeeming factor for Hulisani is that it turned last year's EBIT loss into a gain of R9.8m, over the last twelve months. When analysing debt levels, the balance sheet is the obvious place to start. But it is Hulisani's earnings that will influence how the balance sheet holds up in the future. So when considering debt, it's definitely worth looking at the earnings trend. Click here for an interactive snapshot.

Finally, a company can only pay off debt with cold hard cash, not accounting profits. So it is important to check how much of its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) converts to actual free cash flow. During the last year, Hulisani burned a lot of cash. While investors are no doubt expecting a reversal of that situation in due course, it clearly does mean its use of debt is more risky.

Our View

On the face of it, Hulisani's conversion of EBIT to free cash flow left us tentative about the stock, and its level of total liabilities was no more enticing than the one empty restaurant on the busiest night of the year. Having said that, its ability to grow its EBIT isn't such a worry. After considering the datapoints discussed, we think Hulisani has too much debt. That sort of riskiness is ok for some, but it certainly doesn't float our boat. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when you are analysing debt. But ultimately, every company can contain risks that exist outside of the balance sheet. Be aware that Hulisani is showing 4 warning signs in our investment analysis , and 1 of those is concerning...

When all is said and done, sometimes its easier to focus on companies that don't even need debt. Readers can access a list of growth stocks with zero net debt 100% free, right now.

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