If You Had Bought Harmonic (NASDAQ:HLIT) Shares Three Years Ago You’d Have Made 76%

By buying an index fund, you can roughly match the market return with ease. But many of us dare to dream of bigger returns, and build a portfolio ourselves. Just take a look at Harmonic Inc. (NASDAQ:HLIT), which is up 76%, over three years, soundly beating the market return of 39% (not including dividends). On the other hand, the returns haven’t been quite so good recently, with shareholders up just 47%.

See our latest analysis for Harmonic

Harmonic isn’t a profitable company, so it is unlikely we’ll see a strong correlation between its share price and its earnings per share (EPS). Arguably revenue is our next best option. Shareholders of unprofitable companies usually expect strong revenue growth. That’s because fast revenue growth can be easily extrapolated to forecast profits, often of considerable size.

Harmonic’s revenue trended up 1.4% each year over three years. Considering the company is losing money, we think that rate of revenue growth is uninspiring. The modest growth is probably broadly reflected in the share price, which is up 21%, per year over 3 years. The real question is when the business will generate profits, and how quickly they will grow. Given the market doesn’t seem too excited about the stock, a closer look at the financial data could pay off, if you can find indications of a stronger growth trend in the future.

You can see how revenue and earnings have changed over time in the image below, (click on the chart to see cashflow).

NasdaqGS:HLIT Income Statement, March 20th 2019
NasdaqGS:HLIT Income Statement, March 20th 2019

We like that insiders have been buying shares in the last twelve months. Even so, future earnings will be far more important to whether current shareholders make money. So it makes a lot of sense to check out what analysts think Harmonic will earn in the future (free profit forecasts)

A Different Perspective

It’s nice to see that Harmonic shareholders have received a total shareholder return of 47% over the last year. There’s no doubt those recent returns are much better than the TSR loss of 3.6% per year over five years. We generally put more weight on the long term performance over the short term, but the recent improvement could hint at a (positive) inflection point within the business. It is all well and good that insiders have been buying shares, but we suggest you check here to see what price insiders were buying at.

There are plenty of other companies that have insiders buying up shares. You probably do not want to miss this free list of growing companies that insiders are buying.

Please note, the market returns quoted in this article reflect the market weighted average returns of stocks that currently trade on US exchanges.

We aim to bring you long-term focused research analysis driven by fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not factor in the latest price-sensitive company announcements or qualitative material.

If you spot an error that warrants correction, please contact the editor at editorial-team@simplywallst.com. This article by Simply Wall St is general in nature. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock, and does not take account of your objectives, or your financial situation. Simply Wall St has no position in the stocks mentioned. Thank you for reading.