Did You Manage To Avoid Shutterstock’s 49% Share Price Drop?

While not a mind-blowing move, it is good to see that the Shutterstock, Inc. (NYSE:SSTK) share price has gained 21% in the last three months. But over the last half decade, the stock has not performed well. After all, the share price is down 49% in that time, significantly under-performing the market.

Check out our latest analysis for Shutterstock

While the efficient markets hypothesis continues to be taught by some, it has been proven that markets are over-reactive dynamic systems, and investors are not always rational. By comparing earnings per share (EPS) and share price changes over time, we can get a feel for how investor attitudes to a company have morphed over time.

During the unfortunate half decade during which the share price slipped, Shutterstock actually saw its earnings per share (EPS) improve by 15% per year. Given the share price reaction, one might suspect that EPS is not a good guide to the business performance during the period (perhaps due to a one-off loss or gain). Alternatively, growth expectations may have been unreasonable in the past. Due to the lack of correlation between the EPS growth and the falling share price, it’s worth taking a look at other metrics to try to understand the share price movement.

In contrast to the share price, revenue has actually increased by 17% a year in the five year period. So it seems one might have to take closer look at the fundamentals to understand why the share price languishes. After all, there may be an opportunity.

Depicted in the graphic below, you’ll see revenue and earnings over time. If you want more detail, you can click on the chart itself.

NYSE:SSTK Income Statement, March 3rd 2019
NYSE:SSTK Income Statement, March 3rd 2019

It’s probably worth noting that the CEO is paid less than the median at similar sized companies. It’s always worth keeping an eye on CEO pay, but a more important question is whether the company will grow earnings throughout the years. If you are thinking of buying or selling Shutterstock stock, you should check out this free report showing analyst profit forecasts.

What about the Total Shareholder Return (TSR)?

We’d be remiss not to mention the difference between Shutterstock’s total shareholder return (TSR) and its share price return. The TSR attempts to capture the value of dividends (as if they were reinvested) and any discounted capital raisings offered to shareholders. We note that Shutterstock’s TSR, at -46% is higher than its share price rise of -49%. When you consider it hasn’t been paying a dividend, this data suggests shareholders may have had the opportunity to acquire attractively priced shares in a discounted capital raising.

A Different Perspective

Shutterstock shareholders are up 2.3% for the year. But that return falls short of the market. But at least that’s still a gain! Over five years the TSR has been a reduction of 11% per year, over five years. It could well be that the business is stabilizing. If you would like to research Shutterstock in more detail then you might want to take a look at whether insiders have been buying or selling shares in the company.

Of course, you might find a fantastic investment by looking elsewhere. So take a peek at this free list of companies we expect will grow earnings.

Please note, the market returns quoted in this article reflect the market weighted average returns of stocks that currently trade on US exchanges.

We aim to bring you long-term focused research analysis driven by fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not factor in the latest price-sensitive company announcements or qualitative material.

If you spot an error that warrants correction, please contact the editor at editorial-team@simplywallst.com. This article by Simply Wall St is general in nature. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock, and does not take account of your objectives, or your financial situation. Simply Wall St has no position in the stocks mentioned. Thank you for reading.