Auditors Are Concerned About J.Jill (NYSE:JILL)

By
Simply Wall St
Published
June 19, 2020

The harsh reality for J.Jill, Inc. (NYSE:JILL) shareholders is that its auditors, PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, expressed doubts about its ability to continue as a going concern, in its reported results to February 2020. This means that, based on the financial results to that date, the company arguably should raise capital, or otherwise strengthen the balance sheet, as soon as possible.

If the company does have to issue more shares, potential investors will be sure to consider how desperate it is for capital. So shareholders should absolutely be taking a close look at how risky the balance sheet is. The big consideration is whether it can repay its debt, since in the worst case scenario, creditors could force the company to bankruptcy.

Check out our latest analysis for J.Jill

What Is J.Jill's Net Debt?

As you can see below, J.Jill had US$234.0m of debt, at February 2020, which is about the same as the year before. You can click the chart for greater detail. However, it also had US$21.5m in cash, and so its net debt is US$212.5m.

NYSE:JILL Historical Debt June 19th 2020

How Strong Is J.Jill's Balance Sheet?

The latest balance sheet data shows that J.Jill had liabilities of US$122.4m due within a year, and liabilities of US$473.0m falling due after that. Offsetting this, it had US$21.5m in cash and US$9.87m in receivables that were due within 12 months. So its liabilities total US$564.0m more than the combination of its cash and short-term receivables.

The deficiency here weighs heavily on the US$34.5m company itself, as if a child were struggling under the weight of an enormous back-pack full of books, his sports gear, and a trumpet. So we'd watch its balance sheet closely, without a doubt. At the end of the day, J.Jill would probably need a major re-capitalization if its creditors were to demand repayment.

We use two main ratios to inform us about debt levels relative to earnings. The first is net debt divided by earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA), while the second is how many times its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) covers its interest expense (or its interest cover, for short). Thus we consider debt relative to earnings both with and without depreciation and amortization expenses.

While J.Jill's debt to EBITDA ratio (3.6) suggests that it uses some debt, its interest cover is very weak, at 1.1, suggesting high leverage. It seems that the business incurs large depreciation and amortisation charges, so maybe its debt load is heavier than it would first appear, since EBITDA is arguably a generous measure of earnings. So shareholders should probably be aware that interest expenses appear to have really impacted the business lately. Even worse, J.Jill saw its EBIT tank 66% over the last 12 months. If earnings continue to follow that trajectory, paying off that debt load will be harder than convincing us to run a marathon in the rain. When analysing debt levels, the balance sheet is the obvious place to start. But ultimately the future profitability of the business will decide if J.Jill can strengthen its balance sheet over time. So if you want to see what the professionals think, you might find this free report on analyst profit forecasts to be interesting.

Finally, a business needs free cash flow to pay off debt; accounting profits just don't cut it. So we always check how much of that EBIT is translated into free cash flow. Over the most recent three years, J.Jill recorded free cash flow worth 62% of its EBIT, which is around normal, given free cash flow excludes interest and tax. This free cash flow puts the company in a good position to pay down debt, when appropriate.

Our View

To be frank both J.Jill's EBIT growth rate and its track record of staying on top of its total liabilities make us rather uncomfortable with its debt levels. But on the bright side, its conversion of EBIT to free cash flow is a good sign, and makes us more optimistic. After considering the datapoints discussed, we think J.Jill has too much debt. While some investors love that sort of risky play, it's certainly not our cup of tea. While some investors may specialize in these sort of situations, it's simply too risky and complicated for us to want to invest in a company after an auditor has expressed doubts about its ability to continue as a going concern. Our preference is to invest in companies that always make sure the auditor has confidence that the company will continue as a going concern. There's no doubt that we learn most about debt from the balance sheet. But ultimately, every company can contain risks that exist outside of the balance sheet. For instance, we've identified 5 warning signs for J.Jill (3 are a bit unpleasant) you should be aware of.

If, after all that, you're more interested in a fast growing company with a rock-solid balance sheet, then check out our list of net cash growth stocks without delay.

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This article by Simply Wall St is general in nature. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock, and does not take account of your objectives, or your financial situation. We aim to bring you long-term focused analysis driven by fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not factor in the latest price-sensitive company announcements or qualitative material. Simply Wall St has no position in any stocks mentioned. Thank you for reading.

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