Big Lots (NYSE:BIG) May Have Issues Allocating Its Capital

By
Simply Wall St
Published
December 31, 2021
NYSE:BIG
Source: Shutterstock

If we want to find a stock that could multiply over the long term, what are the underlying trends we should look for? Typically, we'll want to notice a trend of growing return on capital employed (ROCE) and alongside that, an expanding base of capital employed. Ultimately, this demonstrates that it's a business that is reinvesting profits at increasing rates of return. However, after investigating Big Lots (NYSE:BIG), we don't think it's current trends fit the mold of a multi-bagger.

Understanding Return On Capital Employed (ROCE)

If you haven't worked with ROCE before, it measures the 'return' (pre-tax profit) a company generates from capital employed in its business. To calculate this metric for Big Lots, this is the formula:

Return on Capital Employed = Earnings Before Interest and Tax (EBIT) ÷ (Total Assets - Current Liabilities)

0.11 = US$305m ÷ (US$4.0b - US$1.2b) (Based on the trailing twelve months to October 2021).

Therefore, Big Lots has an ROCE of 11%. In isolation, that's a pretty standard return but against the Multiline Retail industry average of 14%, it's not as good.

View our latest analysis for Big Lots

roce
NYSE:BIG Return on Capital Employed December 31st 2021

In the above chart we have measured Big Lots' prior ROCE against its prior performance, but the future is arguably more important. If you'd like to see what analysts are forecasting going forward, you should check out our free report for Big Lots.

What Can We Tell From Big Lots' ROCE Trend?

In terms of Big Lots' historical ROCE movements, the trend isn't fantastic. Over the last five years, returns on capital have decreased to 11% from 25% five years ago. On the other hand, the company has been employing more capital without a corresponding improvement in sales in the last year, which could suggest these investments are longer term plays. It's worth keeping an eye on the company's earnings from here on to see if these investments do end up contributing to the bottom line.

On a related note, Big Lots has decreased its current liabilities to 29% of total assets. So we could link some of this to the decrease in ROCE. Effectively this means their suppliers or short-term creditors are funding less of the business, which reduces some elements of risk. Since the business is basically funding more of its operations with it's own money, you could argue this has made the business less efficient at generating ROCE.

Our Take On Big Lots' ROCE

To conclude, we've found that Big Lots is reinvesting in the business, but returns have been falling. And with the stock having returned a mere 8.2% in the last five years to shareholders, you could argue that they're aware of these lackluster trends. As a result, if you're hunting for a multi-bagger, we think you'd have more luck elsewhere.

Big Lots does have some risks, we noticed 3 warning signs (and 1 which is significant) we think you should know about.

For those who like to invest in solid companies, check out this free list of companies with solid balance sheets and high returns on equity.

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