Stock Analysis

Avantor (NYSE:AVTR) Has A Pretty Healthy Balance Sheet

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NYSE:AVTR
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David Iben put it well when he said, 'Volatility is not a risk we care about. What we care about is avoiding the permanent loss of capital.' So it seems the smart money knows that debt - which is usually involved in bankruptcies - is a very important factor, when you assess how risky a company is. As with many other companies Avantor, Inc. (NYSE:AVTR) makes use of debt. But is this debt a concern to shareholders?

Why Does Debt Bring Risk?

Debt is a tool to help businesses grow, but if a business is incapable of paying off its lenders, then it exists at their mercy. Part and parcel of capitalism is the process of 'creative destruction' where failed businesses are mercilessly liquidated by their bankers. However, a more common (but still painful) scenario is that it has to raise new equity capital at a low price, thus permanently diluting shareholders. Having said that, the most common situation is where a company manages its debt reasonably well - and to its own advantage. The first thing to do when considering how much debt a business uses is to look at its cash and debt together.

Check out our latest analysis for Avantor

What Is Avantor's Net Debt?

As you can see below, Avantor had US$4.82b of debt at December 2020, down from US$5.06b a year prior. However, because it has a cash reserve of US$286.6m, its net debt is less, at about US$4.54b.

debt-equity-history-analysis
NYSE:AVTR Debt to Equity History March 16th 2021

How Healthy Is Avantor's Balance Sheet?

According to the last reported balance sheet, Avantor had liabilities of US$1.24b due within 12 months, and liabilities of US$5.99b due beyond 12 months. Offsetting this, it had US$286.6m in cash and US$1.11b in receivables that were due within 12 months. So its liabilities outweigh the sum of its cash and (near-term) receivables by US$5.83b.

This deficit isn't so bad because Avantor is worth a massive US$16.9b, and thus could probably raise enough capital to shore up its balance sheet, if the need arose. But we definitely want to keep our eyes open to indications that its debt is bringing too much risk.

We use two main ratios to inform us about debt levels relative to earnings. The first is net debt divided by earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA), while the second is how many times its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) covers its interest expense (or its interest cover, for short). The advantage of this approach is that we take into account both the absolute quantum of debt (with net debt to EBITDA) and the actual interest expenses associated with that debt (with its interest cover ratio).

While Avantor's debt to EBITDA ratio (4.0) suggests that it uses some debt, its interest cover is very weak, at 2.4, suggesting high leverage. It seems clear that the cost of borrowing money is negatively impacting returns for shareholders, of late. On a lighter note, we note that Avantor grew its EBIT by 25% in the last year. If it can maintain that kind of improvement, its debt load will begin to melt away like glaciers in a warming world. When analysing debt levels, the balance sheet is the obvious place to start. But it is future earnings, more than anything, that will determine Avantor's ability to maintain a healthy balance sheet going forward. So if you're focused on the future you can check out this free report showing analyst profit forecasts.

Finally, a company can only pay off debt with cold hard cash, not accounting profits. So we clearly need to look at whether that EBIT is leading to corresponding free cash flow. During the last three years, Avantor produced sturdy free cash flow equating to 73% of its EBIT, about what we'd expect. This free cash flow puts the company in a good position to pay down debt, when appropriate.

Our View

Both Avantor's ability to to grow its EBIT and its conversion of EBIT to free cash flow gave us comfort that it can handle its debt. But truth be told its interest cover had us nibbling our nails. Considering this range of data points, we think Avantor is in a good position to manage its debt levels. Having said that, the load is sufficiently heavy that we would recommend any shareholders keep a close eye on it. There's no doubt that we learn most about debt from the balance sheet. But ultimately, every company can contain risks that exist outside of the balance sheet. We've identified 3 warning signs with Avantor (at least 1 which makes us a bit uncomfortable) , and understanding them should be part of your investment process.

If you're interested in investing in businesses that can grow profits without the burden of debt, then check out this free list of growing businesses that have net cash on the balance sheet.

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What are the risks and opportunities for Avantor?

Avantor, Inc. provides products and services to customers in biopharma, healthcare, education and government, advanced technologies, and applied materials industries in the Americas, Europe, Asia, the Middle East, and Africa.

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Rewards

  • Price-To-Earnings ratio (26.5x) is below the Life Sciences industry average (31.1x)

  • Earnings are forecast to grow 12.26% per year

  • Earnings grew by 28.5% over the past year

Risks

  • Debt is not well covered by operating cash flow

  • Shareholders have been diluted in the past year

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