If You Had Bought XOMA (NASDAQ:XOMA) Stock Five Years Ago, You’d Be Sitting On A 76% Loss, Today

It is doubtless a positive to see that the XOMA Corporation (NASDAQ:XOMA) share price has gained some 63% in the last three months. But that doesn’t change the fact that the returns over the last half decade have been stomach churning. In fact, the share price has tumbled down a mountain to land 76% lower after that period. So we don’t gain too much confidence from the recent recovery. The real question is whether the business can leave its past behind and improve itself over the years ahead.

See our latest analysis for XOMA

XOMA isn’t currently profitable, so most analysts would look to revenue growth to get an idea of how fast the underlying business is growing. Shareholders of unprofitable companies usually expect strong revenue growth. Some companies are willing to postpone profitability to grow revenue faster, but in that case one does expect good top-line growth.

In the last five years XOMA saw its revenue shrink by 1.5% per year. While far from catastrophic that is not good. If a business loses money, you want it to grow, so no surprises that the share price has dropped 25% each year in that time. It takes a certain kind of mental fortitude (or recklessness) to buy shares in a company that loses money and doesn’t grow revenue. Fear of becoming a ‘bagholder’ may be keeping people away from this stock.

NasdaqGM:XOMA Income Statement, July 25th 2019
NasdaqGM:XOMA Income Statement, July 25th 2019

If you are thinking of buying or selling XOMA stock, you should check out this FREE detailed report on its balance sheet.

A Different Perspective

Investors in XOMA had a tough year, with a total loss of 21%, against a market gain of about 6.5%. Even the share prices of good stocks drop sometimes, but we want to see improvements in the fundamental metrics of a business, before getting too interested. However, the loss over the last year isn’t as bad as the 25% per annum loss investors have suffered over the last half decade. We’d need to see some sustained improvements in the key metrics before we could muster much enthusiasm. Most investors take the time to check the data on insider transactions. You can click here to see if insiders have been buying or selling.

If you like to buy stocks alongside management, then you might just love this free list of companies. (Hint: insiders have been buying them).

Please note, the market returns quoted in this article reflect the market weighted average returns of stocks that currently trade on US exchanges.

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