Stock Analysis

Cinemark Holdings (NYSE:CNK) Has A Somewhat Strained Balance Sheet

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NYSE:CNK
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Some say volatility, rather than debt, is the best way to think about risk as an investor, but Warren Buffett famously said that 'Volatility is far from synonymous with risk.' So it might be obvious that you need to consider debt, when you think about how risky any given stock is, because too much debt can sink a company. We can see that Cinemark Holdings, Inc. (NYSE:CNK) does use debt in its business. But the more important question is: how much risk is that debt creating?

When Is Debt A Problem?

Debt is a tool to help businesses grow, but if a business is incapable of paying off its lenders, then it exists at their mercy. If things get really bad, the lenders can take control of the business. However, a more frequent (but still costly) occurrence is where a company must issue shares at bargain-basement prices, permanently diluting shareholders, just to shore up its balance sheet. Of course, debt can be an important tool in businesses, particularly capital heavy businesses. When we think about a company's use of debt, we first look at cash and debt together.

Check out our latest analysis for Cinemark Holdings

What Is Cinemark Holdings's Net Debt?

As you can see below, Cinemark Holdings had US$2.50b of debt, at June 2022, which is about the same as the year before. You can click the chart for greater detail. However, because it has a cash reserve of US$699.4m, its net debt is less, at about US$1.80b.

debt-equity-history-analysis
NYSE:CNK Debt to Equity History August 12th 2022

How Strong Is Cinemark Holdings' Balance Sheet?

We can see from the most recent balance sheet that Cinemark Holdings had liabilities of US$725.8m falling due within a year, and liabilities of US$4.06b due beyond that. Offsetting this, it had US$699.4m in cash and US$112.3m in receivables that were due within 12 months. So its liabilities outweigh the sum of its cash and (near-term) receivables by US$3.97b.

The deficiency here weighs heavily on the US$2.01b company itself, as if a child were struggling under the weight of an enormous back-pack full of books, his sports gear, and a trumpet. So we'd watch its balance sheet closely, without a doubt. After all, Cinemark Holdings would likely require a major re-capitalisation if it had to pay its creditors today.

We measure a company's debt load relative to its earnings power by looking at its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) and by calculating how easily its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) cover its interest expense (interest cover). The advantage of this approach is that we take into account both the absolute quantum of debt (with net debt to EBITDA) and the actual interest expenses associated with that debt (with its interest cover ratio).

Weak interest cover of 0.34 times and a disturbingly high net debt to EBITDA ratio of 5.8 hit our confidence in Cinemark Holdings like a one-two punch to the gut. The debt burden here is substantial. However, the silver lining was that Cinemark Holdings achieved a positive EBIT of US$57m in the last twelve months, an improvement on the prior year's loss. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when you are analysing debt. But it is future earnings, more than anything, that will determine Cinemark Holdings's ability to maintain a healthy balance sheet going forward. So if you want to see what the professionals think, you might find this free report on analyst profit forecasts to be interesting.

But our final consideration is also important, because a company cannot pay debt with paper profits; it needs cold hard cash. So it is important to check how much of its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) converts to actual free cash flow. Over the last year, Cinemark Holdings actually produced more free cash flow than EBIT. There's nothing better than incoming cash when it comes to staying in your lenders' good graces.

Our View

On the face of it, Cinemark Holdings's interest cover left us tentative about the stock, and its level of total liabilities was no more enticing than the one empty restaurant on the busiest night of the year. But on the bright side, its conversion of EBIT to free cash flow is a good sign, and makes us more optimistic. Looking at the bigger picture, it seems clear to us that Cinemark Holdings's use of debt is creating risks for the company. If all goes well, that should boost returns, but on the flip side, the risk of permanent capital loss is elevated by the debt. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when you are analysing debt. But ultimately, every company can contain risks that exist outside of the balance sheet. For example, we've discovered 2 warning signs for Cinemark Holdings (1 is concerning!) that you should be aware of before investing here.

If, after all that, you're more interested in a fast growing company with a rock-solid balance sheet, then check out our list of net cash growth stocks without delay.

Valuation is complex, but we're helping make it simple.

Find out whether Cinemark Holdings is potentially over or undervalued by checking out our comprehensive analysis, which includes fair value estimates, risks and warnings, dividends, insider transactions and financial health.

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About NYSE:CNK

Cinemark Holdings

Cinemark Holdings, Inc., together with its subsidiaries, engages in the motion picture exhibition business.

The Snowflake is a visual investment summary with the score of each axis being calculated by 6 checks in 5 areas.

Analysis AreaScore (0-6)
Valuation5
Future Growth5
Past Performance0
Financial Health3
Dividends0

Read more about these checks in the individual report sections or in our analysis model.

Undervalued with high growth potential.