Stock Analysis

Ryerson Holding (NYSE:RYI) Seems To Use Debt Quite Sensibly

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NYSE:RYI
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Legendary fund manager Li Lu (who Charlie Munger backed) once said, 'The biggest investment risk is not the volatility of prices, but whether you will suffer a permanent loss of capital.' So it might be obvious that you need to consider debt, when you think about how risky any given stock is, because too much debt can sink a company. We note that Ryerson Holding Corporation (NYSE:RYI) does have debt on its balance sheet. But should shareholders be worried about its use of debt?

When Is Debt Dangerous?

Debt and other liabilities become risky for a business when it cannot easily fulfill those obligations, either with free cash flow or by raising capital at an attractive price. Ultimately, if the company can't fulfill its legal obligations to repay debt, shareholders could walk away with nothing. However, a more usual (but still expensive) situation is where a company must dilute shareholders at a cheap share price simply to get debt under control. By replacing dilution, though, debt can be an extremely good tool for businesses that need capital to invest in growth at high rates of return. The first step when considering a company's debt levels is to consider its cash and debt together.

See our latest analysis for Ryerson Holding

What Is Ryerson Holding's Debt?

As you can see below, Ryerson Holding had US$674.9m of debt at September 2021, down from US$818.6m a year prior. On the flip side, it has US$39.9m in cash leading to net debt of about US$635.0m.

debt-equity-history-analysis
NYSE:RYI Debt to Equity History January 12th 2022

How Healthy Is Ryerson Holding's Balance Sheet?

The latest balance sheet data shows that Ryerson Holding had liabilities of US$893.2m due within a year, and liabilities of US$1.12b falling due after that. Offsetting these obligations, it had cash of US$39.9m as well as receivables valued at US$717.8m due within 12 months. So it has liabilities totalling US$1.25b more than its cash and near-term receivables, combined.

Given this deficit is actually higher than the company's market capitalization of US$959.9m, we think shareholders really should watch Ryerson Holding's debt levels, like a parent watching their child ride a bike for the first time. In the scenario where the company had to clean up its balance sheet quickly, it seems likely shareholders would suffer extensive dilution.

In order to size up a company's debt relative to its earnings, we calculate its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) and its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) divided by its interest expense (its interest cover). This way, we consider both the absolute quantum of the debt, as well as the interest rates paid on it.

Ryerson Holding has net debt worth 1.8 times EBITDA, which isn't too much, but its interest cover looks a bit on the low side, with EBIT at only 5.3 times the interest expense. While that doesn't worry us too much, it does suggest the interest payments are somewhat of a burden. Pleasingly, Ryerson Holding is growing its EBIT faster than former Australian PM Bob Hawke downs a yard glass, boasting a 197% gain in the last twelve months. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when you are analysing debt. But it is future earnings, more than anything, that will determine Ryerson Holding's ability to maintain a healthy balance sheet going forward. So if you're focused on the future you can check out this free report showing analyst profit forecasts.

But our final consideration is also important, because a company cannot pay debt with paper profits; it needs cold hard cash. So we always check how much of that EBIT is translated into free cash flow. Over the most recent three years, Ryerson Holding recorded free cash flow worth 71% of its EBIT, which is around normal, given free cash flow excludes interest and tax. This free cash flow puts the company in a good position to pay down debt, when appropriate.

Our View

When it comes to the balance sheet, the standout positive for Ryerson Holding was the fact that it seems able to grow its EBIT confidently. But the other factors we noted above weren't so encouraging. In particular, level of total liabilities gives us cold feet. Looking at all this data makes us feel a little cautious about Ryerson Holding's debt levels. While we appreciate debt can enhance returns on equity, we'd suggest that shareholders keep close watch on its debt levels, lest they increase. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when you are analysing debt. However, not all investment risk resides within the balance sheet - far from it. We've identified 4 warning signs with Ryerson Holding (at least 3 which don't sit too well with us) , and understanding them should be part of your investment process.

If, after all that, you're more interested in a fast growing company with a rock-solid balance sheet, then check out our list of net cash growth stocks without delay.

What are the risks and opportunities for Ryerson Holding?

Ryerson Holding Corporation, together with its subsidiaries, processes and distributes industrial metals in the United States, Canada, Mexico, and China.

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Rewards

  • Trading at 7% below our estimate of its fair value

  • Earnings grew by 204.6% over the past year

Risks

  • Has a high level of debt

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