Stock Analysis

Returns On Capital At Ryerson Holding (NYSE:RYI) Have Stalled

  •  Updated
NYSE:RYI
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To find a multi-bagger stock, what are the underlying trends we should look for in a business? Ideally, a business will show two trends; firstly a growing return on capital employed (ROCE) and secondly, an increasing amount of capital employed. Put simply, these types of businesses are compounding machines, meaning they are continually reinvesting their earnings at ever-higher rates of return. Although, when we looked at Ryerson Holding (NYSE:RYI), it didn't seem to tick all of these boxes.

Return On Capital Employed (ROCE): What is it?

For those that aren't sure what ROCE is, it measures the amount of pre-tax profits a company can generate from the capital employed in its business. The formula for this calculation on Ryerson Holding is:

Return on Capital Employed = Earnings Before Interest and Tax (EBIT) ÷ (Total Assets - Current Liabilities)

0.11 = US$144m ÷ (US$2.2b - US$874m) (Based on the trailing twelve months to June 2021).

Thus, Ryerson Holding has an ROCE of 11%. That's a relatively normal return on capital, and it's around the 12% generated by the Metals and Mining industry.

Check out our latest analysis for Ryerson Holding

roce
NYSE:RYI Return on Capital Employed September 8th 2021

Above you can see how the current ROCE for Ryerson Holding compares to its prior returns on capital, but there's only so much you can tell from the past. If you're interested, you can view the analysts predictions in our free report on analyst forecasts for the company.

What Does the ROCE Trend For Ryerson Holding Tell Us?

Over the past five years, Ryerson Holding's ROCE and capital employed have both remained mostly flat. Businesses with these traits tend to be mature and steady operations because they're past the growth phase. So don't be surprised if Ryerson Holding doesn't end up being a multi-bagger in a few years time.

On another note, while the change in ROCE trend might not scream for attention, it's interesting that the current liabilities have actually gone up over the last five years. This is intriguing because if current liabilities hadn't increased to 39% of total assets, this reported ROCE would probably be less than11% because total capital employed would be higher.The 11% ROCE could be even lower if current liabilities weren't 39% of total assets, because the the formula would show a larger base of total capital employed. So while current liabilities isn't high right now, keep an eye out in case it increases further, because this can introduce some elements of risk.

The Bottom Line On Ryerson Holding's ROCE

We can conclude that in regards to Ryerson Holding's returns on capital employed and the trends, there isn't much change to report on. Investors must think there's better things to come because the stock has knocked it out of the park, delivering a 133% gain to shareholders who have held over the last five years. But if the trajectory of these underlying trends continue, we think the likelihood of it being a multi-bagger from here isn't high.

On a final note, we found 4 warning signs for Ryerson Holding (1 doesn't sit too well with us) you should be aware of.

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