We Think Ingevity (NYSE:NGVT) Can Stay On Top Of Its Debt

By
Simply Wall St
Published
January 19, 2022
NYSE:NGVT
Source: Shutterstock

David Iben put it well when he said, 'Volatility is not a risk we care about. What we care about is avoiding the permanent loss of capital.' So it seems the smart money knows that debt - which is usually involved in bankruptcies - is a very important factor, when you assess how risky a company is. We can see that Ingevity Corporation (NYSE:NGVT) does use debt in its business. But the more important question is: how much risk is that debt creating?

What Risk Does Debt Bring?

Debt assists a business until the business has trouble paying it off, either with new capital or with free cash flow. In the worst case scenario, a company can go bankrupt if it cannot pay its creditors. While that is not too common, we often do see indebted companies permanently diluting shareholders because lenders force them to raise capital at a distressed price. Having said that, the most common situation is where a company manages its debt reasonably well - and to its own advantage. When we examine debt levels, we first consider both cash and debt levels, together.

See our latest analysis for Ingevity

What Is Ingevity's Debt?

As you can see below, Ingevity had US$1.18b of debt, at September 2021, which is about the same as the year before. You can click the chart for greater detail. On the flip side, it has US$269.4m in cash leading to net debt of about US$909.2m.

debt-equity-history-analysis
NYSE:NGVT Debt to Equity History January 19th 2022

How Healthy Is Ingevity's Balance Sheet?

The latest balance sheet data shows that Ingevity had liabilities of US$247.6m due within a year, and liabilities of US$1.53b falling due after that. Offsetting this, it had US$269.4m in cash and US$181.9m in receivables that were due within 12 months. So its liabilities total US$1.33b more than the combination of its cash and short-term receivables.

This deficit isn't so bad because Ingevity is worth US$2.86b, and thus could probably raise enough capital to shore up its balance sheet, if the need arose. However, it is still worthwhile taking a close look at its ability to pay off debt.

In order to size up a company's debt relative to its earnings, we calculate its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) and its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) divided by its interest expense (its interest cover). This way, we consider both the absolute quantum of the debt, as well as the interest rates paid on it.

Ingevity's net debt of 2.0 times EBITDA suggests graceful use of debt. And the alluring interest cover (EBIT of 7.0 times interest expense) certainly does not do anything to dispel this impression. Also relevant is that Ingevity has grown its EBIT by a very respectable 24% in the last year, thus enhancing its ability to pay down debt. There's no doubt that we learn most about debt from the balance sheet. But ultimately the future profitability of the business will decide if Ingevity can strengthen its balance sheet over time. So if you want to see what the professionals think, you might find this free report on analyst profit forecasts to be interesting.

Finally, while the tax-man may adore accounting profits, lenders only accept cold hard cash. So the logical step is to look at the proportion of that EBIT that is matched by actual free cash flow. During the last three years, Ingevity produced sturdy free cash flow equating to 69% of its EBIT, about what we'd expect. This free cash flow puts the company in a good position to pay down debt, when appropriate.

Our View

Happily, Ingevity's impressive EBIT growth rate implies it has the upper hand on its debt. But truth be told we feel its level of total liabilities does undermine this impression a bit. All these things considered, it appears that Ingevity can comfortably handle its current debt levels. Of course, while this leverage can enhance returns on equity, it does bring more risk, so it's worth keeping an eye on this one. There's no doubt that we learn most about debt from the balance sheet. However, not all investment risk resides within the balance sheet - far from it. Case in point: We've spotted 3 warning signs for Ingevity you should be aware of.

At the end of the day, it's often better to focus on companies that are free from net debt. You can access our special list of such companies (all with a track record of profit growth). It's free.

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