Returns On Capital At Ecolab (NYSE:ECL) Have Hit The Brakes

September 29, 2022
  •  Updated
October 11, 2022
NYSE:ECL
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Did you know there are some financial metrics that can provide clues of a potential multi-bagger? In a perfect world, we'd like to see a company investing more capital into its business and ideally the returns earned from that capital are also increasing. Ultimately, this demonstrates that it's a business that is reinvesting profits at increasing rates of return. In light of that, when we looked at Ecolab (NYSE:ECL) and its ROCE trend, we weren't exactly thrilled.

Understanding Return On Capital Employed (ROCE)

If you haven't worked with ROCE before, it measures the 'return' (pre-tax profit) a company generates from capital employed in its business. To calculate this metric for Ecolab, this is the formula:

Return on Capital Employed = Earnings Before Interest and Tax (EBIT) ÷ (Total Assets - Current Liabilities)

0.11 = US$1.8b ÷ (US$21b - US$3.8b) (Based on the trailing twelve months to June 2022).

Therefore, Ecolab has an ROCE of 11%. In absolute terms, that's a pretty normal return, and it's somewhat close to the Chemicals industry average of 12%.

Check out our latest analysis for Ecolab

roce
NYSE:ECL Return on Capital Employed September 29th 2022

Above you can see how the current ROCE for Ecolab compares to its prior returns on capital, but there's only so much you can tell from the past. If you'd like to see what analysts are forecasting going forward, you should check out our free report for Ecolab.

The Trend Of ROCE

There hasn't been much to report for Ecolab's returns and its level of capital employed because both metrics have been steady for the past five years. This tells us the company isn't reinvesting in itself, so it's plausible that it's past the growth phase. So unless we see a substantial change at Ecolab in terms of ROCE and additional investments being made, we wouldn't hold our breath on it being a multi-bagger. With fewer investment opportunities, it makes sense that Ecolab has been paying out a decent 35% of its earnings to shareholders. Given the business isn't reinvesting in itself, it makes sense to distribute a portion of earnings among shareholders.

In Conclusion...

In summary, Ecolab isn't compounding its earnings but is generating stable returns on the same amount of capital employed. And investors may be recognizing these trends since the stock has only returned a total of 20% to shareholders over the last five years. Therefore, if you're looking for a multi-bagger, we'd propose looking at other options.

If you want to continue researching Ecolab, you might be interested to know about the 1 warning sign that our analysis has discovered.

If you want to search for solid companies with great earnings, check out this free list of companies with good balance sheets and impressive returns on equity.

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