Stock Analysis

Does Chemours (NYSE:CC) Have A Healthy Balance Sheet?

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NYSE:CC
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Howard Marks put it nicely when he said that, rather than worrying about share price volatility, 'The possibility of permanent loss is the risk I worry about... and every practical investor I know worries about.' So it might be obvious that you need to consider debt, when you think about how risky any given stock is, because too much debt can sink a company. We can see that The Chemours Company (NYSE:CC) does use debt in its business. But the real question is whether this debt is making the company risky.

Why Does Debt Bring Risk?

Debt assists a business until the business has trouble paying it off, either with new capital or with free cash flow. Ultimately, if the company can't fulfill its legal obligations to repay debt, shareholders could walk away with nothing. However, a more common (but still painful) scenario is that it has to raise new equity capital at a low price, thus permanently diluting shareholders. By replacing dilution, though, debt can be an extremely good tool for businesses that need capital to invest in growth at high rates of return. When we examine debt levels, we first consider both cash and debt levels, together.

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What Is Chemours's Net Debt?

You can click the graphic below for the historical numbers, but it shows that Chemours had US$3.90b of debt in June 2021, down from US$4.29b, one year before. However, it does have US$1.14b in cash offsetting this, leading to net debt of about US$2.77b.

debt-equity-history-analysis
NYSE:CC Debt to Equity History November 1st 2021

How Strong Is Chemours' Balance Sheet?

The latest balance sheet data shows that Chemours had liabilities of US$1.67b due within a year, and liabilities of US$4.91b falling due after that. Offsetting this, it had US$1.14b in cash and US$802.0m in receivables that were due within 12 months. So its liabilities outweigh the sum of its cash and (near-term) receivables by US$4.64b.

When you consider that this deficiency exceeds the company's US$4.63b market capitalization, you might well be inclined to review the balance sheet intently. In the scenario where the company had to clean up its balance sheet quickly, it seems likely shareholders would suffer extensive dilution.

In order to size up a company's debt relative to its earnings, we calculate its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) and its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) divided by its interest expense (its interest cover). The advantage of this approach is that we take into account both the absolute quantum of debt (with net debt to EBITDA) and the actual interest expenses associated with that debt (with its interest cover ratio).

While Chemours's debt to EBITDA ratio (3.5) suggests that it uses some debt, its interest cover is very weak, at 2.3, suggesting high leverage. So shareholders should probably be aware that interest expenses appear to have really impacted the business lately. However, one redeeming factor is that Chemours grew its EBIT at 20% over the last 12 months, boosting its ability to handle its debt. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when you are analysing debt. But ultimately the future profitability of the business will decide if Chemours can strengthen its balance sheet over time. So if you want to see what the professionals think, you might find this free report on analyst profit forecasts to be interesting.

Finally, a business needs free cash flow to pay off debt; accounting profits just don't cut it. So the logical step is to look at the proportion of that EBIT that is matched by actual free cash flow. During the last three years, Chemours produced sturdy free cash flow equating to 73% of its EBIT, about what we'd expect. This free cash flow puts the company in a good position to pay down debt, when appropriate.

Our View

While Chemours's interest cover has us nervous. For example, its conversion of EBIT to free cash flow and EBIT growth rate give us some confidence in its ability to manage its debt. Looking at all the angles mentioned above, it does seem to us that Chemours is a somewhat risky investment as a result of its debt. Not all risk is bad, as it can boost share price returns if it pays off, but this debt risk is worth keeping in mind. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when you are analysing debt. But ultimately, every company can contain risks that exist outside of the balance sheet. For example Chemours has 3 warning signs (and 1 which is potentially serious) we think you should know about.

If you're interested in investing in businesses that can grow profits without the burden of debt, then check out this free list of growing businesses that have net cash on the balance sheet.

What are the risks and opportunities for Chemours?

The Chemours Company provides performance chemicals in North America, the Asia Pacific, Europe, the Middle East, Africa, and Latin America.

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Rewards

  • Trading at 76.6% below our estimate of its fair value

  • Earnings grew by 130.5% over the past year

Risks

  • Earnings are forecast to decline by an average of 0.7% per year for the next 3 years

  • Has a high level of debt

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