We Think U.S. Concrete (NASDAQ:USCR) Is Taking Some Risk With Its Debt

By
Simply Wall St
Published
May 24, 2021
Source: Shutterstock

Some say volatility, rather than debt, is the best way to think about risk as an investor, but Warren Buffett famously said that 'Volatility is far from synonymous with risk.' It's only natural to consider a company's balance sheet when you examine how risky it is, since debt is often involved when a business collapses. We note that U.S. Concrete, Inc. (NASDAQ:USCR) does have debt on its balance sheet. But is this debt a concern to shareholders?

When Is Debt Dangerous?

Debt assists a business until the business has trouble paying it off, either with new capital or with free cash flow. If things get really bad, the lenders can take control of the business. However, a more usual (but still expensive) situation is where a company must dilute shareholders at a cheap share price simply to get debt under control. By replacing dilution, though, debt can be an extremely good tool for businesses that need capital to invest in growth at high rates of return. The first step when considering a company's debt levels is to consider its cash and debt together.

See our latest analysis for U.S. Concrete

What Is U.S. Concrete's Net Debt?

The image below, which you can click on for greater detail, shows that U.S. Concrete had debt of US$661.4m at the end of March 2021, a reduction from US$707.1m over a year. However, because it has a cash reserve of US$22.8m, its net debt is less, at about US$638.6m.

debt-equity-history-analysis
NasdaqGS:USCR Debt to Equity History May 24th 2021

A Look At U.S. Concrete's Liabilities

We can see from the most recent balance sheet that U.S. Concrete had liabilities of US$237.4m falling due within a year, and liabilities of US$884.5m due beyond that. On the other hand, it had cash of US$22.8m and US$211.9m worth of receivables due within a year. So its liabilities outweigh the sum of its cash and (near-term) receivables by US$887.2m.

This is a mountain of leverage relative to its market capitalization of US$929.0m. This suggests shareholders would be heavily diluted if the company needed to shore up its balance sheet in a hurry.

In order to size up a company's debt relative to its earnings, we calculate its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) and its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) divided by its interest expense (its interest cover). This way, we consider both the absolute quantum of the debt, as well as the interest rates paid on it.

While U.S. Concrete's debt to EBITDA ratio (3.9) suggests that it uses some debt, its interest cover is very weak, at 1.4, suggesting high leverage. In large part that's due to the company's significant depreciation and amortisation charges, which arguably mean its EBITDA is a very generous measure of earnings, and its debt may be more of a burden than it first appears. It seems clear that the cost of borrowing money is negatively impacting returns for shareholders, of late. Notably, U.S. Concrete's EBIT was pretty flat over the last year, which isn't ideal given the debt load. There's no doubt that we learn most about debt from the balance sheet. But ultimately the future profitability of the business will decide if U.S. Concrete can strengthen its balance sheet over time. So if you want to see what the professionals think, you might find this free report on analyst profit forecasts to be interesting.

Finally, a business needs free cash flow to pay off debt; accounting profits just don't cut it. So we clearly need to look at whether that EBIT is leading to corresponding free cash flow. Happily for any shareholders, U.S. Concrete actually produced more free cash flow than EBIT over the last three years. There's nothing better than incoming cash when it comes to staying in your lenders' good graces.

Our View

Neither U.S. Concrete's ability to cover its interest expense with its EBIT nor its level of total liabilities gave us confidence in its ability to take on more debt. But the good news is it seems to be able to convert EBIT to free cash flow with ease. When we consider all the factors discussed, it seems to us that U.S. Concrete is taking some risks with its use of debt. So while that leverage does boost returns on equity, we wouldn't really want to see it increase from here. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when you are analysing debt. However, not all investment risk resides within the balance sheet - far from it. Be aware that U.S. Concrete is showing 4 warning signs in our investment analysis , and 1 of those is potentially serious...

When all is said and done, sometimes its easier to focus on companies that don't even need debt. Readers can access a list of growth stocks with zero net debt 100% free, right now.

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