Stock Analysis

Wyndham Hotels & Resorts (NYSE:WH) Has A Pretty Healthy Balance Sheet

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NYSE:WH
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David Iben put it well when he said, 'Volatility is not a risk we care about. What we care about is avoiding the permanent loss of capital.' When we think about how risky a company is, we always like to look at its use of debt, since debt overload can lead to ruin. Importantly, Wyndham Hotels & Resorts, Inc. (NYSE:WH) does carry debt. But is this debt a concern to shareholders?

Why Does Debt Bring Risk?

Generally speaking, debt only becomes a real problem when a company can't easily pay it off, either by raising capital or with its own cash flow. In the worst case scenario, a company can go bankrupt if it cannot pay its creditors. However, a more frequent (but still costly) occurrence is where a company must issue shares at bargain-basement prices, permanently diluting shareholders, just to shore up its balance sheet. Of course, debt can be an important tool in businesses, particularly capital heavy businesses. The first step when considering a company's debt levels is to consider its cash and debt together.

Check out our latest analysis for Wyndham Hotels & Resorts

What Is Wyndham Hotels & Resorts's Net Debt?

The chart below, which you can click on for greater detail, shows that Wyndham Hotels & Resorts had US$2.03b in debt in June 2022; about the same as the year before. However, it does have US$400.0m in cash offsetting this, leading to net debt of about US$1.63b.

debt-equity-history-analysis
NYSE:WH Debt to Equity History September 8th 2022

How Strong Is Wyndham Hotels & Resorts' Balance Sheet?

Zooming in on the latest balance sheet data, we can see that Wyndham Hotels & Resorts had liabilities of US$387.0m due within 12 months and liabilities of US$2.77b due beyond that. Offsetting this, it had US$400.0m in cash and US$261.0m in receivables that were due within 12 months. So its liabilities total US$2.49b more than the combination of its cash and short-term receivables.

This deficit isn't so bad because Wyndham Hotels & Resorts is worth US$5.99b, and thus could probably raise enough capital to shore up its balance sheet, if the need arose. But we definitely want to keep our eyes open to indications that its debt is bringing too much risk.

In order to size up a company's debt relative to its earnings, we calculate its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) and its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) divided by its interest expense (its interest cover). The advantage of this approach is that we take into account both the absolute quantum of debt (with net debt to EBITDA) and the actual interest expenses associated with that debt (with its interest cover ratio).

Wyndham Hotels & Resorts's debt is 2.7 times its EBITDA, and its EBIT cover its interest expense 6.5 times over. This suggests that while the debt levels are significant, we'd stop short of calling them problematic. It is well worth noting that Wyndham Hotels & Resorts's EBIT shot up like bamboo after rain, gaining 76% in the last twelve months. That'll make it easier to manage its debt. When analysing debt levels, the balance sheet is the obvious place to start. But it is future earnings, more than anything, that will determine Wyndham Hotels & Resorts's ability to maintain a healthy balance sheet going forward. So if you want to see what the professionals think, you might find this free report on analyst profit forecasts to be interesting.

Finally, while the tax-man may adore accounting profits, lenders only accept cold hard cash. So we always check how much of that EBIT is translated into free cash flow. During the last three years, Wyndham Hotels & Resorts produced sturdy free cash flow equating to 72% of its EBIT, about what we'd expect. This cold hard cash means it can reduce its debt when it wants to.

Our View

The good news is that Wyndham Hotels & Resorts's demonstrated ability to grow its EBIT delights us like a fluffy puppy does a toddler. But truth be told we feel its net debt to EBITDA does undermine this impression a bit. Taking all this data into account, it seems to us that Wyndham Hotels & Resorts takes a pretty sensible approach to debt. That means they are taking on a bit more risk, in the hope of boosting shareholder returns. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when you are analysing debt. However, not all investment risk resides within the balance sheet - far from it. These risks can be hard to spot. Every company has them, and we've spotted 3 warning signs for Wyndham Hotels & Resorts (of which 1 is a bit unpleasant!) you should know about.

At the end of the day, it's often better to focus on companies that are free from net debt. You can access our special list of such companies (all with a track record of profit growth). It's free.

What are the risks and opportunities for Wyndham Hotels & Resorts?

Wyndham Hotels & Resorts, Inc. operates as a hotel franchisor worldwide.

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Rewards

  • Earnings are forecast to grow 4.36% per year

  • Earnings grew by 85.1% over the past year

Risks

  • Significant insider selling over the past 3 months

  • Has a high level of debt

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