These 4 Measures Indicate That Meritage Homes (NYSE:MTH) Is Using Debt Reasonably Well

September 02, 2022
  •  Updated
November 14, 2022
NYSE:MTH
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Howard Marks put it nicely when he said that, rather than worrying about share price volatility, 'The possibility of permanent loss is the risk I worry about... and every practical investor I know worries about.' It's only natural to consider a company's balance sheet when you examine how risky it is, since debt is often involved when a business collapses. We note that Meritage Homes Corporation (NYSE:MTH) does have debt on its balance sheet. But the more important question is: how much risk is that debt creating?

Why Does Debt Bring Risk?

Generally speaking, debt only becomes a real problem when a company can't easily pay it off, either by raising capital or with its own cash flow. In the worst case scenario, a company can go bankrupt if it cannot pay its creditors. However, a more common (but still painful) scenario is that it has to raise new equity capital at a low price, thus permanently diluting shareholders. By replacing dilution, though, debt can be an extremely good tool for businesses that need capital to invest in growth at high rates of return. The first thing to do when considering how much debt a business uses is to look at its cash and debt together.

Check out our latest analysis for Meritage Homes

What Is Meritage Homes's Debt?

As you can see below, Meritage Homes had US$1.16b of debt, at June 2022, which is about the same as the year before. You can click the chart for greater detail. On the flip side, it has US$272.1m in cash leading to net debt of about US$886.5m.

debt-equity-history-analysis
NYSE:MTH Debt to Equity History September 2nd 2022

How Healthy Is Meritage Homes' Balance Sheet?

We can see from the most recent balance sheet that Meritage Homes had liabilities of US$644.5m falling due within a year, and liabilities of US$1.25b due beyond that. On the other hand, it had cash of US$272.1m and US$171.4m worth of receivables due within a year. So it has liabilities totalling US$1.45b more than its cash and near-term receivables, combined.

Meritage Homes has a market capitalization of US$2.83b, so it could very likely raise cash to ameliorate its balance sheet, if the need arose. But we definitely want to keep our eyes open to indications that its debt is bringing too much risk.

We measure a company's debt load relative to its earnings power by looking at its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) and by calculating how easily its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) cover its interest expense (interest cover). The advantage of this approach is that we take into account both the absolute quantum of debt (with net debt to EBITDA) and the actual interest expenses associated with that debt (with its interest cover ratio).

Meritage Homes has a low net debt to EBITDA ratio of only 0.73. And its EBIT easily covers its interest expense, being 6k times the size. So we're pretty relaxed about its super-conservative use of debt. On top of that, Meritage Homes grew its EBIT by 60% over the last twelve months, and that growth will make it easier to handle its debt. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when you are analysing debt. But ultimately the future profitability of the business will decide if Meritage Homes can strengthen its balance sheet over time. So if you want to see what the professionals think, you might find this free report on analyst profit forecasts to be interesting.

Finally, a business needs free cash flow to pay off debt; accounting profits just don't cut it. So we always check how much of that EBIT is translated into free cash flow. In the last three years, Meritage Homes created free cash flow amounting to 14% of its EBIT, an uninspiring performance. For us, cash conversion that low sparks a little paranoia about is ability to extinguish debt.

Our View

Meritage Homes's interest cover suggests it can handle its debt as easily as Cristiano Ronaldo could score a goal against an under 14's goalkeeper. But, on a more sombre note, we are a little concerned by its conversion of EBIT to free cash flow. Looking at all the aforementioned factors together, it strikes us that Meritage Homes can handle its debt fairly comfortably. Of course, while this leverage can enhance returns on equity, it does bring more risk, so it's worth keeping an eye on this one. There's no doubt that we learn most about debt from the balance sheet. However, not all investment risk resides within the balance sheet - far from it. Be aware that Meritage Homes is showing 3 warning signs in our investment analysis , and 2 of those shouldn't be ignored...

Of course, if you're the type of investor who prefers buying stocks without the burden of debt, then don't hesitate to discover our exclusive list of net cash growth stocks, today.

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