Is Malibu Boats (NASDAQ:MBUU) Using Too Much Debt?

By
Simply Wall St
Published
December 22, 2021
NasdaqGM:MBUU
Source: Shutterstock

David Iben put it well when he said, 'Volatility is not a risk we care about. What we care about is avoiding the permanent loss of capital.' So it seems the smart money knows that debt - which is usually involved in bankruptcies - is a very important factor, when you assess how risky a company is. Importantly, Malibu Boats, Inc. (NASDAQ:MBUU) does carry debt. But should shareholders be worried about its use of debt?

Why Does Debt Bring Risk?

Debt assists a business until the business has trouble paying it off, either with new capital or with free cash flow. In the worst case scenario, a company can go bankrupt if it cannot pay its creditors. However, a more common (but still painful) scenario is that it has to raise new equity capital at a low price, thus permanently diluting shareholders. Of course, plenty of companies use debt to fund growth, without any negative consequences. When we think about a company's use of debt, we first look at cash and debt together.

View our latest analysis for Malibu Boats

How Much Debt Does Malibu Boats Carry?

The image below, which you can click on for greater detail, shows that at September 2021 Malibu Boats had debt of US$123.1m, up from US$74.1m in one year. However, because it has a cash reserve of US$29.5m, its net debt is less, at about US$93.6m.

debt-equity-history-analysis
NasdaqGM:MBUU Debt to Equity History December 22nd 2021

A Look At Malibu Boats' Liabilities

According to the last reported balance sheet, Malibu Boats had liabilities of US$210.9m due within 12 months, and liabilities of US$134.5m due beyond 12 months. Offsetting this, it had US$29.5m in cash and US$41.2m in receivables that were due within 12 months. So its liabilities total US$274.7m more than the combination of its cash and short-term receivables.

Given Malibu Boats has a market capitalization of US$1.38b, it's hard to believe these liabilities pose much threat. Having said that, it's clear that we should continue to monitor its balance sheet, lest it change for the worse.

We use two main ratios to inform us about debt levels relative to earnings. The first is net debt divided by earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA), while the second is how many times its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) covers its interest expense (or its interest cover, for short). This way, we consider both the absolute quantum of the debt, as well as the interest rates paid on it.

Malibu Boats's net debt is only 0.49 times its EBITDA. And its EBIT covers its interest expense a whopping 62.8 times over. So we're pretty relaxed about its super-conservative use of debt. On top of that, Malibu Boats grew its EBIT by 73% over the last twelve months, and that growth will make it easier to handle its debt. When analysing debt levels, the balance sheet is the obvious place to start. But it is future earnings, more than anything, that will determine Malibu Boats's ability to maintain a healthy balance sheet going forward. So if you're focused on the future you can check out this free report showing analyst profit forecasts.

Finally, a company can only pay off debt with cold hard cash, not accounting profits. So we clearly need to look at whether that EBIT is leading to corresponding free cash flow. Over the most recent three years, Malibu Boats recorded free cash flow worth 58% of its EBIT, which is around normal, given free cash flow excludes interest and tax. This cold hard cash means it can reduce its debt when it wants to.

Our View

Happily, Malibu Boats's impressive interest cover implies it has the upper hand on its debt. And the good news does not stop there, as its EBIT growth rate also supports that impression! Zooming out, Malibu Boats seems to use debt quite reasonably; and that gets the nod from us. While debt does bring risk, when used wisely it can also bring a higher return on equity. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when you are analysing debt. But ultimately, every company can contain risks that exist outside of the balance sheet. For example, we've discovered 1 warning sign for Malibu Boats that you should be aware of before investing here.

If, after all that, you're more interested in a fast growing company with a rock-solid balance sheet, then check out our list of net cash growth stocks without delay.

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