Stock Analysis

These 4 Measures Indicate That Lifetime Brands (NASDAQ:LCUT) Is Using Debt Reasonably Well

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NasdaqGS:LCUT
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Howard Marks put it nicely when he said that, rather than worrying about share price volatility, 'The possibility of permanent loss is the risk I worry about... and every practical investor I know worries about.' So it might be obvious that you need to consider debt, when you think about how risky any given stock is, because too much debt can sink a company. We note that Lifetime Brands, Inc. (NASDAQ:LCUT) does have debt on its balance sheet. But the more important question is: how much risk is that debt creating?

When Is Debt A Problem?

Debt assists a business until the business has trouble paying it off, either with new capital or with free cash flow. In the worst case scenario, a company can go bankrupt if it cannot pay its creditors. However, a more frequent (but still costly) occurrence is where a company must issue shares at bargain-basement prices, permanently diluting shareholders, just to shore up its balance sheet. Having said that, the most common situation is where a company manages its debt reasonably well - and to its own advantage. The first step when considering a company's debt levels is to consider its cash and debt together.

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How Much Debt Does Lifetime Brands Carry?

As you can see below, Lifetime Brands had US$287.2m of debt, at December 2020, which is about the same as the year before. You can click the chart for greater detail. On the flip side, it has US$36.0m in cash leading to net debt of about US$251.3m.

debt-equity-history-analysis
NasdaqGS:LCUT Debt to Equity History April 1st 2021

A Look At Lifetime Brands' Liabilities

Zooming in on the latest balance sheet data, we can see that Lifetime Brands had liabilities of US$180.1m due within 12 months and liabilities of US$397.3m due beyond that. On the other hand, it had cash of US$36.0m and US$170.1m worth of receivables due within a year. So its liabilities outweigh the sum of its cash and (near-term) receivables by US$371.3m.

When you consider that this deficiency exceeds the company's US$329.6m market capitalization, you might well be inclined to review the balance sheet intently. In the scenario where the company had to clean up its balance sheet quickly, it seems likely shareholders would suffer extensive dilution.

We use two main ratios to inform us about debt levels relative to earnings. The first is net debt divided by earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA), while the second is how many times its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) covers its interest expense (or its interest cover, for short). This way, we consider both the absolute quantum of the debt, as well as the interest rates paid on it.

While Lifetime Brands's debt to EBITDA ratio (3.5) suggests that it uses some debt, its interest cover is very weak, at 2.4, suggesting high leverage. So shareholders should probably be aware that interest expenses appear to have really impacted the business lately. The good news is that Lifetime Brands grew its EBIT a smooth 44% over the last twelve months. Like the milk of human kindness that sort of growth increases resilience, making the company more capable of managing debt. There's no doubt that we learn most about debt from the balance sheet. But ultimately the future profitability of the business will decide if Lifetime Brands can strengthen its balance sheet over time. So if you're focused on the future you can check out this free report showing analyst profit forecasts.

Finally, while the tax-man may adore accounting profits, lenders only accept cold hard cash. So we always check how much of that EBIT is translated into free cash flow. Over the most recent three years, Lifetime Brands recorded free cash flow worth 75% of its EBIT, which is around normal, given free cash flow excludes interest and tax. This cold hard cash means it can reduce its debt when it wants to.

Our View

Lifetime Brands's EBIT growth rate was a real positive on this analysis, as was its conversion of EBIT to free cash flow. In contrast, our confidence was undermined by its apparent struggle to cover its interest expense with its EBIT. Looking at all this data makes us feel a little cautious about Lifetime Brands's debt levels. While debt does have its upside in higher potential returns, we think shareholders should definitely consider how debt levels might make the stock more risky. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when you are analysing debt. However, not all investment risk resides within the balance sheet - far from it. For instance, we've identified 1 warning sign for Lifetime Brands that you should be aware of.

Of course, if you're the type of investor who prefers buying stocks without the burden of debt, then don't hesitate to discover our exclusive list of net cash growth stocks, today.

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What are the risks and opportunities for Lifetime Brands?

Lifetime Brands, Inc. designs, sources, and sells branded kitchenware, tableware, and other products for use in the home in the United States and internationally.

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Rewards

  • Trading at 59.9% below our estimate of its fair value

  • Earnings are forecast to grow 124.14% per year

Risks

No risks detected for LCUT from our risks checks.

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