Don't Race Out To Buy PGG Wrightson Limited (NZSE:PGW) Just Because It's Going Ex-Dividend

By
Simply Wall St
Published
September 04, 2021
NZSE:PGW
Source: Shutterstock

Readers hoping to buy PGG Wrightson Limited (NZSE:PGW) for its dividend will need to make their move shortly, as the stock is about to trade ex-dividend. The ex-dividend date is one business day before the record date, which is the cut-off date for shareholders to be present on the company's books to be eligible for a dividend payment. The ex-dividend date is an important date to be aware of as any purchase of the stock made on or after this date might mean a late settlement that doesn't show on the record date. In other words, investors can purchase PGG Wrightson's shares before the 9th of September in order to be eligible for the dividend, which will be paid on the 4th of October.

The company's next dividend payment will be NZ$0.19 per share, on the back of last year when the company paid a total of NZ$0.32 to shareholders. Based on the last year's worth of payments, PGG Wrightson stock has a trailing yield of around 8.3% on the current share price of NZ$3.85. If you buy this business for its dividend, you should have an idea of whether PGG Wrightson's dividend is reliable and sustainable. That's why we should always check whether the dividend payments appear sustainable, and if the company is growing.

See our latest analysis for PGG Wrightson

If a company pays out more in dividends than it earned, then the dividend might become unsustainable - hardly an ideal situation. Last year, PGG Wrightson paid out 93% of its income as dividends, which is above a level that we're comfortable with, especially if the company needs to reinvest in its business. That said, even highly profitable companies sometimes might not generate enough cash to pay the dividend, which is why we should always check if the dividend is covered by cash flow. What's good is that dividends were well covered by free cash flow, with the company paying out 18% of its cash flow last year.

It's good to see that while PGG Wrightson's dividends were not well covered by profits, at least they are affordable from a cash perspective. Still, if this were to happen repeatedly, we'd be concerned about whether the dividend is sustainable in a downturn.

Click here to see the company's payout ratio, plus analyst estimates of its future dividends.

historic-dividend
NZSE:PGW Historic Dividend September 4th 2021

Have Earnings And Dividends Been Growing?

When earnings decline, dividend companies become much harder to analyse and own safely. If earnings decline and the company is forced to cut its dividend, investors could watch the value of their investment go up in smoke. PGG Wrightson's earnings per share have fallen at approximately 12% a year over the previous five years. Such a sharp decline casts doubt on the future sustainability of the dividend.

Many investors will assess a company's dividend performance by evaluating how much the dividend payments have changed over time. In the past eight years, PGG Wrightson has increased its dividend at approximately 16% a year on average. The only way to pay higher dividends when earnings are shrinking is either to pay out a larger percentage of profits, spend cash from the balance sheet, or borrow the money. PGG Wrightson is already paying out 93% of its profits, and with shrinking earnings we think it's unlikely that this dividend will grow quickly in the future.

To Sum It Up

Is PGG Wrightson an attractive dividend stock, or better left on the shelf? It's not a great combination to see a company with earnings in decline and paying out 93% of its profits, which could imply the dividend may be at risk of being cut in the future. However, the cash payout ratio was much lower - good news from a dividend perspective - which makes us wonder why there is such a mis-match between income and cashflow. Overall it doesn't look like the most suitable dividend stock for a long-term buy and hold investor.

With that being said, if you're still considering PGG Wrightson as an investment, you'll find it beneficial to know what risks this stock is facing. For example, PGG Wrightson has 3 warning signs (and 1 which is a bit concerning) we think you should know about.

A common investment mistake is buying the first interesting stock you see. Here you can find a list of promising dividend stocks with a greater than 2% yield and an upcoming dividend.

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This article by Simply Wall St is general in nature. We provide commentary based on historical data and analyst forecasts only using an unbiased methodology and our articles are not intended to be financial advice. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock, and does not take account of your objectives, or your financial situation. We aim to bring you long-term focused analysis driven by fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not factor in the latest price-sensitive company announcements or qualitative material. Simply Wall St has no position in any stocks mentioned.
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