Here's Why Yara International (OB:YAR) Can Manage Its Debt Responsibly

By
Simply Wall St
Published
February 25, 2022
OB:YAR
Source: Shutterstock

Legendary fund manager Li Lu (who Charlie Munger backed) once said, 'The biggest investment risk is not the volatility of prices, but whether you will suffer a permanent loss of capital.' It's only natural to consider a company's balance sheet when you examine how risky it is, since debt is often involved when a business collapses. As with many other companies Yara International ASA (OB:YAR) makes use of debt. But is this debt a concern to shareholders?

What Risk Does Debt Bring?

Debt is a tool to help businesses grow, but if a business is incapable of paying off its lenders, then it exists at their mercy. Part and parcel of capitalism is the process of 'creative destruction' where failed businesses are mercilessly liquidated by their bankers. While that is not too common, we often do see indebted companies permanently diluting shareholders because lenders force them to raise capital at a distressed price. Of course, debt can be an important tool in businesses, particularly capital heavy businesses. The first thing to do when considering how much debt a business uses is to look at its cash and debt together.

Check out our latest analysis for Yara International

How Much Debt Does Yara International Carry?

As you can see below, Yara International had US$3.90b of debt, at December 2021, which is about the same as the year before. You can click the chart for greater detail. However, it does have US$394.0m in cash offsetting this, leading to net debt of about US$3.51b.

debt-equity-history-analysis
OB:YAR Debt to Equity History February 25th 2022

A Look At Yara International's Liabilities

The latest balance sheet data shows that Yara International had liabilities of US$5.54b due within a year, and liabilities of US$4.61b falling due after that. Offsetting this, it had US$394.0m in cash and US$2.14b in receivables that were due within 12 months. So its liabilities outweigh the sum of its cash and (near-term) receivables by US$7.62b.

This is a mountain of leverage even relative to its gargantuan market capitalization of US$12.0b. This suggests shareholders would be heavily diluted if the company needed to shore up its balance sheet in a hurry.

We measure a company's debt load relative to its earnings power by looking at its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) and by calculating how easily its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) cover its interest expense (interest cover). Thus we consider debt relative to earnings both with and without depreciation and amortization expenses.

Yara International's net debt is only 1.3 times its EBITDA. And its EBIT covers its interest expense a whopping 23.9 times over. So you could argue it is no more threatened by its debt than an elephant is by a mouse. On top of that, Yara International grew its EBIT by 63% over the last twelve months, and that growth will make it easier to handle its debt. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when you are analysing debt. But ultimately the future profitability of the business will decide if Yara International can strengthen its balance sheet over time. So if you're focused on the future you can check out this free report showing analyst profit forecasts.

Finally, a business needs free cash flow to pay off debt; accounting profits just don't cut it. So we always check how much of that EBIT is translated into free cash flow. Over the most recent three years, Yara International recorded free cash flow worth 72% of its EBIT, which is around normal, given free cash flow excludes interest and tax. This free cash flow puts the company in a good position to pay down debt, when appropriate.

Our View

Yara International's interest cover suggests it can handle its debt as easily as Cristiano Ronaldo could score a goal against an under 14's goalkeeper. But truth be told we feel its level of total liabilities does undermine this impression a bit. When we consider the range of factors above, it looks like Yara International is pretty sensible with its use of debt. While that brings some risk, it can also enhance returns for shareholders. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when you are analysing debt. But ultimately, every company can contain risks that exist outside of the balance sheet. For example, we've discovered 4 warning signs for Yara International that you should be aware of before investing here.

Of course, if you're the type of investor who prefers buying stocks without the burden of debt, then don't hesitate to discover our exclusive list of net cash growth stocks, today.

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