Oil and Natural Gas (NSE:ONGC) Seems To Use Debt Quite Sensibly

By
Simply Wall St
Published
March 15, 2022
NSEI:ONGC
Source: Shutterstock

Some say volatility, rather than debt, is the best way to think about risk as an investor, but Warren Buffett famously said that 'Volatility is far from synonymous with risk.' When we think about how risky a company is, we always like to look at its use of debt, since debt overload can lead to ruin. Importantly, Oil and Natural Gas Corporation Limited (NSE:ONGC) does carry debt. But should shareholders be worried about its use of debt?

When Is Debt Dangerous?

Debt is a tool to help businesses grow, but if a business is incapable of paying off its lenders, then it exists at their mercy. Ultimately, if the company can't fulfill its legal obligations to repay debt, shareholders could walk away with nothing. However, a more frequent (but still costly) occurrence is where a company must issue shares at bargain-basement prices, permanently diluting shareholders, just to shore up its balance sheet. Of course, the upside of debt is that it often represents cheap capital, especially when it replaces dilution in a company with the ability to reinvest at high rates of return. When we examine debt levels, we first consider both cash and debt levels, together.

See our latest analysis for Oil and Natural Gas

What Is Oil and Natural Gas's Net Debt?

You can click the graphic below for the historical numbers, but it shows that as of September 2021 Oil and Natural Gas had ₹1.23t of debt, an increase on ₹1.04t, over one year. However, it does have ₹121.6b in cash offsetting this, leading to net debt of about ₹1.11t.

debt-equity-history-analysis
NSEI:ONGC Debt to Equity History March 15th 2022

How Strong Is Oil and Natural Gas' Balance Sheet?

We can see from the most recent balance sheet that Oil and Natural Gas had liabilities of ₹1.20t falling due within a year, and liabilities of ₹1.71t due beyond that. On the other hand, it had cash of ₹121.6b and ₹165.5b worth of receivables due within a year. So its liabilities total ₹2.62t more than the combination of its cash and short-term receivables.

Given this deficit is actually higher than the company's massive market capitalization of ₹2.16t, we think shareholders really should watch Oil and Natural Gas's debt levels, like a parent watching their child ride a bike for the first time. Hypothetically, extremely heavy dilution would be required if the company were forced to pay down its liabilities by raising capital at the current share price.

In order to size up a company's debt relative to its earnings, we calculate its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) and its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) divided by its interest expense (its interest cover). Thus we consider debt relative to earnings both with and without depreciation and amortization expenses.

Oil and Natural Gas's net debt to EBITDA ratio of about 1.7 suggests only moderate use of debt. And its commanding EBIT of 1k times its interest expense, implies the debt load is as light as a peacock feather. Better yet, Oil and Natural Gas grew its EBIT by 220% last year, which is an impressive improvement. That boost will make it even easier to pay down debt going forward. There's no doubt that we learn most about debt from the balance sheet. But ultimately the future profitability of the business will decide if Oil and Natural Gas can strengthen its balance sheet over time. So if you want to see what the professionals think, you might find this free report on analyst profit forecasts to be interesting.

Finally, a company can only pay off debt with cold hard cash, not accounting profits. So the logical step is to look at the proportion of that EBIT that is matched by actual free cash flow. Looking at the most recent three years, Oil and Natural Gas recorded free cash flow of 37% of its EBIT, which is weaker than we'd expect. That weak cash conversion makes it more difficult to handle indebtedness.

Our View

Both Oil and Natural Gas's ability to to cover its interest expense with its EBIT and its EBIT growth rate gave us comfort that it can handle its debt. In contrast, our confidence was undermined by its apparent struggle to handle its total liabilities. Looking at all this data makes us feel a little cautious about Oil and Natural Gas's debt levels. While we appreciate debt can enhance returns on equity, we'd suggest that shareholders keep close watch on its debt levels, lest they increase. When analysing debt levels, the balance sheet is the obvious place to start. However, not all investment risk resides within the balance sheet - far from it. To that end, you should learn about the 3 warning signs we've spotted with Oil and Natural Gas (including 1 which shouldn't be ignored) .

At the end of the day, it's often better to focus on companies that are free from net debt. You can access our special list of such companies (all with a track record of profit growth). It's free.

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