Stock Analysis

Does Oil and Natural Gas (NSE:ONGC) Have A Healthy Balance Sheet?

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NSEI:ONGC
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The external fund manager backed by Berkshire Hathaway's Charlie Munger, Li Lu, makes no bones about it when he says 'The biggest investment risk is not the volatility of prices, but whether you will suffer a permanent loss of capital.' When we think about how risky a company is, we always like to look at its use of debt, since debt overload can lead to ruin. We note that Oil and Natural Gas Corporation Limited (NSE:ONGC) does have debt on its balance sheet. But the real question is whether this debt is making the company risky.

Why Does Debt Bring Risk?

Debt assists a business until the business has trouble paying it off, either with new capital or with free cash flow. In the worst case scenario, a company can go bankrupt if it cannot pay its creditors. However, a more common (but still painful) scenario is that it has to raise new equity capital at a low price, thus permanently diluting shareholders. Having said that, the most common situation is where a company manages its debt reasonably well - and to its own advantage. The first step when considering a company's debt levels is to consider its cash and debt together.

Check out our latest analysis for Oil and Natural Gas

How Much Debt Does Oil and Natural Gas Carry?

As you can see below, Oil and Natural Gas had ₹894.6b of debt at September 2020, down from ₹1.06t a year prior. However, it does have ₹250.3b in cash offsetting this, leading to net debt of about ₹644.3b.

debt-equity-history-analysis
NSEI:ONGC Debt to Equity History March 29th 2021

A Look At Oil and Natural Gas' Liabilities

We can see from the most recent balance sheet that Oil and Natural Gas had liabilities of ₹1.19t falling due within a year, and liabilities of ₹1.59t due beyond that. Offsetting these obligations, it had cash of ₹250.3b as well as receivables valued at ₹123.3b due within 12 months. So its liabilities total ₹2.40t more than the combination of its cash and short-term receivables.

The deficiency here weighs heavily on the ₹1.29t company itself, as if a child were struggling under the weight of an enormous back-pack full of books, his sports gear, and a trumpet. So we'd watch its balance sheet closely, without a doubt. After all, Oil and Natural Gas would likely require a major re-capitalisation if it had to pay its creditors today.

We use two main ratios to inform us about debt levels relative to earnings. The first is net debt divided by earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA), while the second is how many times its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) covers its interest expense (or its interest cover, for short). Thus we consider debt relative to earnings both with and without depreciation and amortization expenses.

We'd say that Oil and Natural Gas's moderate net debt to EBITDA ratio ( being 1.6), indicates prudence when it comes to debt. And its commanding EBIT of 1k times its interest expense, implies the debt load is as light as a peacock feather. The modesty of its debt load may become crucial for Oil and Natural Gas if management cannot prevent a repeat of the 66% cut to EBIT over the last year. Falling earnings (if the trend continues) could eventually make even modest debt quite risky. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when you are analysing debt. But it is future earnings, more than anything, that will determine Oil and Natural Gas's ability to maintain a healthy balance sheet going forward. So if you want to see what the professionals think, you might find this free report on analyst profit forecasts to be interesting.

But our final consideration is also important, because a company cannot pay debt with paper profits; it needs cold hard cash. So we always check how much of that EBIT is translated into free cash flow. In the last three years, Oil and Natural Gas's free cash flow amounted to 44% of its EBIT, less than we'd expect. That weak cash conversion makes it more difficult to handle indebtedness.

Our View

To be frank both Oil and Natural Gas's EBIT growth rate and its track record of staying on top of its total liabilities make us rather uncomfortable with its debt levels. But at least it's pretty decent at covering its interest expense with its EBIT; that's encouraging. Overall, it seems to us that Oil and Natural Gas's balance sheet is really quite a risk to the business. For this reason we're pretty cautious about the stock, and we think shareholders should keep a close eye on its liquidity. There's no doubt that we learn most about debt from the balance sheet. But ultimately, every company can contain risks that exist outside of the balance sheet. These risks can be hard to spot. Every company has them, and we've spotted 3 warning signs for Oil and Natural Gas you should know about.

Of course, if you're the type of investor who prefers buying stocks without the burden of debt, then don't hesitate to discover our exclusive list of net cash growth stocks, today.

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