Imagine Owning P.G. Nikas (ATH:NIKAS) And Trying To Stomach The 75% Share Price Drop

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While it may not be enough for some shareholders, we think it is good to see the P.G. Nikas S.A. (ATH:NIKAS) share price up 27% in a single quarter. The negative return of 75% over five years does not impress. But on the bright side, that is better than the market return of 57%.

See our latest analysis for P.G. Nikas

Given that P.G. Nikas didn’t make a profit in the last twelve months, we’ll focus on revenue growth to form a quick view of its business development. Generally speaking, companies without profits are expected to grow revenue every year, and at a good clip. That’s because it’s hard to be confident a company will be sustainable if revenue growth is negligible, and it never makes a profit.

Over half a decade P.G. Nikas reduced its trailing twelve month revenue by 7.8% for each year. While far from catastrophic that is not good. If a business loses money, you want it to grow, so no surprises that the share price has dropped 24% each year in that time. We’re generally averse to companies with declining revenues, but we’re not alone in that. That is not really what the successful investors we know aim for.

You can see how revenue and earnings have changed over time in the image below, (click on the chart to see cashflow).

ATSE:NIKAS Income Statement, May 30th 2019
ATSE:NIKAS Income Statement, May 30th 2019

Take a more thorough look at P.G. Nikas’s financial health with this free report on its balance sheet.

What about the Total Shareholder Return (TSR)?

Investors should note that there’s a difference between P.G. Nikas’s total shareholder return (TSR) and its share price change, which we’ve covered above. Arguably the TSR is a more complete return calculation because it accounts for the value of dividends (as if they were reinvested), along with the hypothetical value of any discounted capital that have been offered to shareholders. We note that P.G. Nikas’s TSR, at -24% is higher than its share price return of -75%. When you consider it hasn’t been paying a dividend, this data suggests shareholders have benefitted from a spin-off, or had the opportunity to acquire attractively priced shares in a discounted capital raising.

A Different Perspective

It’s good to see that P.G. Nikas has rewarded shareholders with a total shareholder return of 59% in the last twelve months. That certainly beats the loss of about 5.4% per year over the last half decade. We generally put more weight on the long term performance over the short term, but the recent improvement could hint at a (positive) inflection point within the business. You could get a better understanding of P.G. Nikas’s growth by checking out this more detailed historical graph of earnings, revenue and cash flow.

If you like to buy stocks alongside management, then you might just love this free list of companies. (Hint: insiders have been buying them).

Please note, the market returns quoted in this article reflect the market weighted average returns of stocks that currently trade on GR exchanges.

We aim to bring you long-term focused research analysis driven by fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not factor in the latest price-sensitive company announcements or qualitative material.

If you spot an error that warrants correction, please contact the editor at editorial-team@simplywallst.com. This article by Simply Wall St is general in nature. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock, and does not take account of your objectives, or your financial situation. Simply Wall St has no position in the stocks mentioned. Thank you for reading.