Is Euromoney Institutional Investor PLC's (LON:ERM) Recent Performancer Underpinned By Weak Financials?

By
Simply Wall St
Published
May 10, 2022
LSE:ERM
Source: Shutterstock

Euromoney Institutional Investor (LON:ERM) has had a rough week with its share price down 4.2%. We decided to study the company's financials to determine if the downtrend will continue as the long-term performance of a company usually dictates market outcomes. Specifically, we decided to study Euromoney Institutional Investor's ROE in this article.

Return on equity or ROE is a key measure used to assess how efficiently a company's management is utilizing the company's capital. In simpler terms, it measures the profitability of a company in relation to shareholder's equity.

See our latest analysis for Euromoney Institutional Investor

How To Calculate Return On Equity?

ROE can be calculated by using the formula:

Return on Equity = Net Profit (from continuing operations) ÷ Shareholders' Equity

So, based on the above formula, the ROE for Euromoney Institutional Investor is:

2.6% = UK£13m ÷ UK£495m (Based on the trailing twelve months to September 2021).

The 'return' is the profit over the last twelve months. So, this means that for every £1 of its shareholder's investments, the company generates a profit of £0.03.

What Is The Relationship Between ROE And Earnings Growth?

So far, we've learned that ROE is a measure of a company's profitability. We now need to evaluate how much profit the company reinvests or "retains" for future growth which then gives us an idea about the growth potential of the company. Assuming all else is equal, companies that have both a higher return on equity and higher profit retention are usually the ones that have a higher growth rate when compared to companies that don't have the same features.

A Side By Side comparison of Euromoney Institutional Investor's Earnings Growth And 2.6% ROE

It is quite clear that Euromoney Institutional Investor's ROE is rather low. Not just that, even compared to the industry average of 9.9%, the company's ROE is entirely unremarkable. Given the circumstances, the significant decline in net income by 15% seen by Euromoney Institutional Investor over the last five years is not surprising. However, there could also be other factors causing the earnings to decline. For example, the business has allocated capital poorly, or that the company has a very high payout ratio.

With the industry earnings declining at a rate of 14% in the same period, we deduce that both the company and the industry are shrinking at the same rate.

past-earnings-growth
LSE:ERM Past Earnings Growth May 10th 2022

Earnings growth is an important metric to consider when valuing a stock. The investor should try to establish if the expected growth or decline in earnings, whichever the case may be, is priced in. This then helps them determine if the stock is placed for a bright or bleak future. If you're wondering about Euromoney Institutional Investor's's valuation, check out this gauge of its price-to-earnings ratio, as compared to its industry.

Is Euromoney Institutional Investor Making Efficient Use Of Its Profits?

With a high three-year median payout ratio of 53% (implying that 47% of the profits are retained), most of Euromoney Institutional Investor's profits are being paid to shareholders, which explains the company's shrinking earnings. The business is only left with a small pool of capital to reinvest - A vicious cycle that doesn't benefit the company in the long-run. You can see the 3 risks we have identified for Euromoney Institutional Investor by visiting our risks dashboard for free on our platform here.

Moreover, Euromoney Institutional Investor has been paying dividends for at least ten years or more suggesting that management must have perceived that the shareholders prefer dividends over earnings growth. Based on the latest analysts' estimates, we found that the company's future payout ratio over the next three years is expected to hold steady at 45%. However, Euromoney Institutional Investor's ROE is predicted to rise to 13% despite there being no anticipated change in its payout ratio.

Summary

Overall, we would be extremely cautious before making any decision on Euromoney Institutional Investor. The company has seen a lack of earnings growth as a result of retaining very little profits and whatever little it does retain, is being reinvested at a very low rate of return. That being so, the latest industry analyst forecasts show that the analysts are expecting to see a huge improvement in the company's earnings growth rate. To know more about the company's future earnings growth forecasts take a look at this free report on analyst forecasts for the company to find out more.

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