Stock Analysis

Is Diageo (LON:DGE) Using Too Much Debt?

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LSE:DGE
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Howard Marks put it nicely when he said that, rather than worrying about share price volatility, 'The possibility of permanent loss is the risk I worry about... and every practical investor I know worries about.' So it seems the smart money knows that debt - which is usually involved in bankruptcies - is a very important factor, when you assess how risky a company is. Importantly, Diageo plc (LON:DGE) does carry debt. But is this debt a concern to shareholders?

When Is Debt Dangerous?

Debt and other liabilities become risky for a business when it cannot easily fulfill those obligations, either with free cash flow or by raising capital at an attractive price. In the worst case scenario, a company can go bankrupt if it cannot pay its creditors. However, a more common (but still painful) scenario is that it has to raise new equity capital at a low price, thus permanently diluting shareholders. Of course, plenty of companies use debt to fund growth, without any negative consequences. When we think about a company's use of debt, we first look at cash and debt together.

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How Much Debt Does Diageo Carry?

You can click the graphic below for the historical numbers, but it shows that as of June 2022 Diageo had UK£16.3b of debt, an increase on UK£14.8b, over one year. However, it also had UK£2.42b in cash, and so its net debt is UK£13.9b.

debt-equity-history-analysis
LSE:DGE Debt to Equity History September 2nd 2022

A Look At Diageo's Liabilities

The latest balance sheet data shows that Diageo had liabilities of UK£8.44b due within a year, and liabilities of UK£18.6b falling due after that. Offsetting this, it had UK£2.42b in cash and UK£2.79b in receivables that were due within 12 months. So its liabilities outweigh the sum of its cash and (near-term) receivables by UK£21.8b.

While this might seem like a lot, it is not so bad since Diageo has a huge market capitalization of UK£84.9b, and so it could probably strengthen its balance sheet by raising capital if it needed to. However, it is still worthwhile taking a close look at its ability to pay off debt.

We use two main ratios to inform us about debt levels relative to earnings. The first is net debt divided by earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA), while the second is how many times its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) covers its interest expense (or its interest cover, for short). This way, we consider both the absolute quantum of the debt, as well as the interest rates paid on it.

Diageo's net debt is 2.7 times its EBITDA, which is a significant but still reasonable amount of leverage. But its EBIT was about 13.1 times its interest expense, implying the company isn't really paying a high cost to maintain that level of debt. Even were the low cost to prove unsustainable, that is a good sign. Also relevant is that Diageo has grown its EBIT by a very respectable 28% in the last year, thus enhancing its ability to pay down debt. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when you are analysing debt. But ultimately the future profitability of the business will decide if Diageo can strengthen its balance sheet over time. So if you're focused on the future you can check out this free report showing analyst profit forecasts.

Finally, while the tax-man may adore accounting profits, lenders only accept cold hard cash. So it's worth checking how much of that EBIT is backed by free cash flow. During the last three years, Diageo produced sturdy free cash flow equating to 62% of its EBIT, about what we'd expect. This cold hard cash means it can reduce its debt when it wants to.

Our View

Happily, Diageo's impressive interest cover implies it has the upper hand on its debt. But, on a more sombre note, we are a little concerned by its net debt to EBITDA. Taking all this data into account, it seems to us that Diageo takes a pretty sensible approach to debt. While that brings some risk, it can also enhance returns for shareholders. When analysing debt levels, the balance sheet is the obvious place to start. But ultimately, every company can contain risks that exist outside of the balance sheet. To that end, you should be aware of the 1 warning sign we've spotted with Diageo .

Of course, if you're the type of investor who prefers buying stocks without the burden of debt, then don't hesitate to discover our exclusive list of net cash growth stocks, today.

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About LSE:DGE

Diageo

Diageo plc, together with its subsidiaries, produces, markets, and sells alcoholic beverages.

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Analysis AreaScore (0-6)
Valuation0
Future Growth3
Past Performance4
Financial Health3
Dividends5

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