Algonquin Power & Utilities (TSE:AQN) Has A Somewhat Strained Balance Sheet

By
Simply Wall St
Published
September 11, 2021
TSX:AQN
Source: Shutterstock

The external fund manager backed by Berkshire Hathaway's Charlie Munger, Li Lu, makes no bones about it when he says 'The biggest investment risk is not the volatility of prices, but whether you will suffer a permanent loss of capital.' It's only natural to consider a company's balance sheet when you examine how risky it is, since debt is often involved when a business collapses. Importantly, Algonquin Power & Utilities Corp. (TSE:AQN) does carry debt. But is this debt a concern to shareholders?

When Is Debt A Problem?

Generally speaking, debt only becomes a real problem when a company can't easily pay it off, either by raising capital or with its own cash flow. Ultimately, if the company can't fulfill its legal obligations to repay debt, shareholders could walk away with nothing. However, a more common (but still painful) scenario is that it has to raise new equity capital at a low price, thus permanently diluting shareholders. Having said that, the most common situation is where a company manages its debt reasonably well - and to its own advantage. The first step when considering a company's debt levels is to consider its cash and debt together.

View our latest analysis for Algonquin Power & Utilities

What Is Algonquin Power & Utilities's Debt?

The image below, which you can click on for greater detail, shows that at June 2021 Algonquin Power & Utilities had debt of US$6.71b, up from US$4.27b in one year. On the flip side, it has US$203.5m in cash leading to net debt of about US$6.50b.

debt-equity-history-analysis
TSX:AQN Debt to Equity History September 12th 2021

A Look At Algonquin Power & Utilities' Liabilities

The latest balance sheet data shows that Algonquin Power & Utilities had liabilities of US$1.36b due within a year, and liabilities of US$8.12b falling due after that. Offsetting these obligations, it had cash of US$203.5m as well as receivables valued at US$324.9m due within 12 months. So its liabilities outweigh the sum of its cash and (near-term) receivables by US$8.95b.

This is a mountain of leverage relative to its market capitalization of US$9.54b. Should its lenders demand that it shore up the balance sheet, shareholders would likely face severe dilution.

We measure a company's debt load relative to its earnings power by looking at its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) and by calculating how easily its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) cover its interest expense (interest cover). Thus we consider debt relative to earnings both with and without depreciation and amortization expenses.

Weak interest cover of 1.8 times and a disturbingly high net debt to EBITDA ratio of 9.1 hit our confidence in Algonquin Power & Utilities like a one-two punch to the gut. The debt burden here is substantial. The good news is that Algonquin Power & Utilities improved its EBIT by 6.5% over the last twelve months, thus gradually reducing its debt levels relative to its earnings. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when you are analysing debt. But ultimately the future profitability of the business will decide if Algonquin Power & Utilities can strengthen its balance sheet over time. So if you want to see what the professionals think, you might find this free report on analyst profit forecasts to be interesting.

Finally, a company can only pay off debt with cold hard cash, not accounting profits. So the logical step is to look at the proportion of that EBIT that is matched by actual free cash flow. Over the last three years, Algonquin Power & Utilities saw substantial negative free cash flow, in total. While investors are no doubt expecting a reversal of that situation in due course, it clearly does mean its use of debt is more risky.

Our View

On the face of it, Algonquin Power & Utilities's net debt to EBITDA left us tentative about the stock, and its conversion of EBIT to free cash flow was no more enticing than the one empty restaurant on the busiest night of the year. But at least it's pretty decent at growing its EBIT; that's encouraging. It's also worth noting that Algonquin Power & Utilities is in the Integrated Utilities industry, which is often considered to be quite defensive. We're quite clear that we consider Algonquin Power & Utilities to be really rather risky, as a result of its balance sheet health. So we're almost as wary of this stock as a hungry kitten is about falling into its owner's fish pond: once bitten, twice shy, as they say. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when you are analysing debt. However, not all investment risk resides within the balance sheet - far from it. To that end, you should learn about the 4 warning signs we've spotted with Algonquin Power & Utilities (including 1 which is potentially serious) .

At the end of the day, it's often better to focus on companies that are free from net debt. You can access our special list of such companies (all with a track record of profit growth). It's free.

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