These 4 Measures Indicate That Anheuser-Busch InBev (EBR:ABI) Is Using Debt Extensively

By
Simply Wall St
Published
August 03, 2021
ENXTBR:ABI
Source: Shutterstock

Some say volatility, rather than debt, is the best way to think about risk as an investor, but Warren Buffett famously said that 'Volatility is far from synonymous with risk.' It's only natural to consider a company's balance sheet when you examine how risky it is, since debt is often involved when a business collapses. We note that Anheuser-Busch InBev SA/NV (EBR:ABI) does have debt on its balance sheet. But is this debt a concern to shareholders?

Why Does Debt Bring Risk?

Debt assists a business until the business has trouble paying it off, either with new capital or with free cash flow. If things get really bad, the lenders can take control of the business. However, a more common (but still painful) scenario is that it has to raise new equity capital at a low price, thus permanently diluting shareholders. Of course, plenty of companies use debt to fund growth, without any negative consequences. When we think about a company's use of debt, we first look at cash and debt together.

View our latest analysis for Anheuser-Busch InBev

How Much Debt Does Anheuser-Busch InBev Carry?

As you can see below, Anheuser-Busch InBev had US$88.3b of debt at June 2021, down from US$110.6b a year prior. On the flip side, it has US$7.08b in cash leading to net debt of about US$81.2b.

debt-equity-history-analysis
ENXTBR:ABI Debt to Equity History August 4th 2021

How Healthy Is Anheuser-Busch InBev's Balance Sheet?

The latest balance sheet data shows that Anheuser-Busch InBev had liabilities of US$30.1b due within a year, and liabilities of US$107.8b falling due after that. Offsetting this, it had US$7.08b in cash and US$5.57b in receivables that were due within 12 months. So it has liabilities totalling US$125.3b more than its cash and near-term receivables, combined.

When you consider that this deficiency exceeds the company's huge US$123.0b market capitalization, you might well be inclined to review the balance sheet intently. In the scenario where the company had to clean up its balance sheet quickly, it seems likely shareholders would suffer extensive dilution.

In order to size up a company's debt relative to its earnings, we calculate its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) and its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) divided by its interest expense (its interest cover). Thus we consider debt relative to earnings both with and without depreciation and amortization expenses.

Anheuser-Busch InBev has a debt to EBITDA ratio of 4.7 and its EBIT covered its interest expense 3.9 times. This suggests that while the debt levels are significant, we'd stop short of calling them problematic. Fortunately, Anheuser-Busch InBev grew its EBIT by 5.3% in the last year, slowly shrinking its debt relative to earnings. There's no doubt that we learn most about debt from the balance sheet. But it is future earnings, more than anything, that will determine Anheuser-Busch InBev's ability to maintain a healthy balance sheet going forward. So if you're focused on the future you can check out this free report showing analyst profit forecasts.

Finally, a business needs free cash flow to pay off debt; accounting profits just don't cut it. So it's worth checking how much of that EBIT is backed by free cash flow. During the last three years, Anheuser-Busch InBev produced sturdy free cash flow equating to 61% of its EBIT, about what we'd expect. This free cash flow puts the company in a good position to pay down debt, when appropriate.

Our View

While Anheuser-Busch InBev's level of total liabilities makes us cautious about it, its track record of managing its debt, based on its EBITDA, is no better. But its not so bad at converting EBIT to free cash flow. Taking the abovementioned factors together we do think Anheuser-Busch InBev's debt poses some risks to the business. So while that leverage does boost returns on equity, we wouldn't really want to see it increase from here. There's no doubt that we learn most about debt from the balance sheet. But ultimately, every company can contain risks that exist outside of the balance sheet. We've identified 1 warning sign with Anheuser-Busch InBev , and understanding them should be part of your investment process.

When all is said and done, sometimes its easier to focus on companies that don't even need debt. Readers can access a list of growth stocks with zero net debt 100% free, right now.

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