Imagine Owning Hamon & Cie (International) And Taking A 98% Loss Square On The Chin

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Long term investing is the way to go, but that doesn’t mean you should hold every stock forever. We really hate to see fellow investors lose their hard-earned money. Anyone who held Hamon & Cie (International) SA (EBR:HAMO) for five years would be nursing their metaphorical wounds since the share price dropped 98% in that time. And we doubt long term believers are the only worried holders, since the stock price has declined 47% over the last twelve months. Furthermore, it’s down 13% in about a quarter, which is even more concerning.

We really feel for shareholders in this scenario. It’s a good reminder of the importance of diversification, and it’s worth keeping in mind there’s more to life than money, anyway.

Check out our latest analysis for Hamon & Cie (International)

There is no denying that markets are sometimes efficient, but prices do not always reflect underlying business performance. One imperfect but simple way to consider how the market perception of a company has shifted is to compare the change in the earnings per share (EPS) with the share price movement.

In the last five years Hamon & Cie (International) improved its bottom line results, having previously been loss-making. That would generally be considered a positive, so we are surprised to see the share price is down.

It could be that the revenue decline of 9.3% per year is viewed as evidence that Hamon & Cie (International) is shrinking. This has probably encouraged some shareholders to sell down the stock.

The chart below shows how revenue and earnings have changed with time, (if you click on the chart you can see the actual values).

ENXTBR:HAMO Income Statement, February 22nd 2019
ENXTBR:HAMO Income Statement, February 22nd 2019

This free interactive report on Hamon & Cie (International)’s balance sheet strength is a great place to start, if you want to investigate the stock further.

What about the Total Shareholder Return (TSR)?

Investors should note that there’s a difference between Hamon & Cie (International)’s total shareholder return (TSR) and its share price change, which we’ve covered above. The TSR is a return calculation that accounts for the value of cash dividends (assuming that any dividend received was reinvested) and the calculated value of any discounted capital raisings. We note that Hamon & Cie (International)’s TSR, at -94% is higher than its share price rise of -98%. When you consider it hasn’t been paying a dividend, this data suggests shareholders may have had the opportunity to acquire attractively priced shares in the business.

A Different Perspective

While the broader market lost about 12% in the twelve months, Hamon & Cie (International) shareholders did even worse, losing 47%. Having said that, its inevitable that some stocks will be oversold in a falling market. The key is to keep your eyes on the fundamental developments. Unfortunately, last year’s performance may indicate unresolved challenges, given that it was worse than the annualised loss of 43% over the last half decade. Generally speaking long term share price weakness can be a bad sign, though contrarian investors might want to research the stock in hope of a turnaround. You might want to assess this data-rich visualization of its earnings, revenue and cash flow.

If you like to buy stocks alongside management, then you might just love this free list of companies. (Hint: insiders have been buying them).

Please note, the market returns quoted in this article reflect the market weighted average returns of stocks that currently trade on BE exchanges.

We aim to bring you long-term focused research analysis driven by fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not factor in the latest price-sensitive company announcements or qualitative material.

If you spot an error that warrants correction, please contact the editor at editorial-team@simplywallst.com. This article by Simply Wall St is general in nature. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock, and does not take account of your objectives, or your financial situation. Simply Wall St has no position in the stocks mentioned. Thank you for reading.