Stock Analysis

Returns On Capital At Bapcor (ASX:BAP) Paint An Interesting Picture

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ASX:BAP
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There are a few key trends to look for if we want to identify the next multi-bagger. In a perfect world, we'd like to see a company investing more capital into its business and ideally the returns earned from that capital are also increasing. Put simply, these types of businesses are compounding machines, meaning they are continually reinvesting their earnings at ever-higher rates of return. However, after briefly looking over the numbers, we don't think Bapcor (ASX:BAP) has the makings of a multi-bagger going forward, but let's have a look at why that may be.

Return On Capital Employed (ROCE): What is it?

For those who don't know, ROCE is a measure of a company's yearly pre-tax profit (its return), relative to the capital employed in the business. Analysts use this formula to calculate it for Bapcor:

Return on Capital Employed = Earnings Before Interest and Tax (EBIT) ÷ (Total Assets - Current Liabilities)

0.10 = AU$139m ÷ (AU$1.7b - AU$329m) (Based on the trailing twelve months to June 2020).

Thus, Bapcor has an ROCE of 10%. On its own, that's a standard return, however it's much better than the 6.9% generated by the Retail Distributors industry.

View our latest analysis for Bapcor

roce
ASX:BAP Return on Capital Employed September 13th 2020

In the above chart we have measured Bapcor's prior ROCE against its prior performance, but the future is arguably more important. If you'd like to see what analysts are forecasting going forward, you should check out our free report for Bapcor.

What The Trend Of ROCE Can Tell Us

We weren't thrilled with the trend because Bapcor's ROCE has reduced by 23% over the last five years, while the business employed 393% more capital. Usually this isn't ideal, but given Bapcor conducted a capital raising before their most recent earnings announcement, that would've likely contributed, at least partially, to the increased capital employed figure. The funds raised likely haven't been put to work yet so it's worth watching what happens in the future with Bapcor's earnings and if they change as a result from the capital raise. Additionally, we found that Bapcor's most recent EBIT figure is around the same as the prior year, so we'd attribute the drop in ROCE mostly to the capital raise.

The Key Takeaway

Even though returns on capital have fallen in the short term, we find it promising that revenue and capital employed have both increased for Bapcor. And the stock has done incredibly well with a 110% return over the last five years, so long term investors are no doubt ecstatic with that result. So while the underlying trends could already be accounted for by investors, we still think this stock is worth looking into further.

One more thing, we've spotted 2 warning signs facing Bapcor that you might find interesting.

While Bapcor may not currently earn the highest returns, we've compiled a list of companies that currently earn more than 25% return on equity. Check out this free list here.

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