We Think Domtar (NYSE:UFS) Can Stay On Top Of Its Debt

David Iben put it well when he said, ‘Volatility is not a risk we care about. What we care about is avoiding the permanent loss of capital.’ So it seems the smart money knows that debt – which is usually involved in bankruptcies – is a very important factor, when you assess how risky a company is. We can see that Domtar Corporation (NYSE:UFS) does use debt in its business. But the real question is whether this debt is making the company risky.

Why Does Debt Bring Risk?

Debt and other liabilities become risky for a business when it cannot easily fulfill those obligations, either with free cash flow or by raising capital at an attractive price. Part and parcel of capitalism is the process of ‘creative destruction’ where failed businesses are mercilessly liquidated by their bankers. However, a more frequent (but still costly) occurrence is where a company must issue shares at bargain-basement prices, permanently diluting shareholders, just to shore up its balance sheet. Of course, debt can be an important tool in businesses, particularly capital heavy businesses. When we examine debt levels, we first consider both cash and debt levels, together.

View our latest analysis for Domtar

What Is Domtar’s Debt?

The image below, which you can click on for greater detail, shows that Domtar had debt of US$857.0m at the end of March 2019, a reduction from US$1.10b over a year. However, because it has a cash reserve of US$94.0m, its net debt is less, at about US$763.0m.

NYSE:UFS Historical Debt, July 29th 2019
NYSE:UFS Historical Debt, July 29th 2019

How Healthy Is Domtar’s Balance Sheet?

The latest balance sheet data shows that Domtar had liabilities of US$753.0m due within a year, and liabilities of US$1.66b falling due after that. On the other hand, it had cash of US$94.0m and US$720.0m worth of receivables due within a year. So its liabilities total US$1.60b more than the combination of its cash and short-term receivables.

Domtar has a market capitalization of US$2.67b, so it could very likely raise cash to ameliorate its balance sheet, if the need arose. But we definitely want to keep our eyes open to indications that its debt is bringing too much risk.

In order to size up a company’s debt relative to its earnings, we calculate its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) and its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) divided by its interest expense (its interest cover). Thus we consider debt relative to earnings both with and without depreciation and amortization expenses.

With net debt sitting at just 0.99 times EBITDA, Domtar is arguably pretty conservatively geared. And it boasts interest cover of 8.2 times, which is more than adequate. In addition to that, we’re happy to report that Domtar has boosted its EBIT by 67%, thus reducing the spectre of future debt repayments. When analysing debt levels, the balance sheet is the obvious place to start. But ultimately the future profitability of the business will decide if Domtar can strengthen its balance sheet over time. So if you’re focused on the future you can check out this free report showing analyst profit forecasts.

But our final consideration is also important, because a company cannot pay debt with paper profits; it needs cold hard cash. So it’s worth checking how much of that EBIT is backed by free cash flow. During the last three years, Domtar produced sturdy free cash flow equating to 73% of its EBIT, about what we’d expect. This cold hard cash means it can reduce its debt when it wants to.

Our View

The good news is that Domtar’s demonstrated ability to grow its EBIT delights us like a fluffy puppy does a toddler. But, on a more sombre note, we are a little concerned by its level of total liabilities. Taking all this data into account, it seems to us that Domtar takes a pretty sensible approach to debt. While that brings some risk, it can also enhance returns for shareholders. Of course, we wouldn’t say no to the extra confidence that we’d gain if we knew that Domtar insiders have been buying shares: if you’re on the same wavelength, you can find out if insiders are buying by clicking this link.

If, after all that, you’re more interested in a fast growing company with a rock-solid balance sheet, then check out our list of net cash growth stocks without delay.

We aim to bring you long-term focused research analysis driven by fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not factor in the latest price-sensitive company announcements or qualitative material.

If you spot an error that warrants correction, please contact the editor at editorial-team@simplywallst.com. This article by Simply Wall St is general in nature. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock, and does not take account of your objectives, or your financial situation. Simply Wall St has no position in the stocks mentioned. Thank you for reading.