If You Had Bought Mapletree North Asia Commercial Trust (SGX:RW0U) Stock A Year Ago, You’d Be Sitting On A 36% Loss, Today

The simplest way to benefit from a rising market is to buy an index fund. Active investors aim to buy stocks that vastly outperform the market – but in the process, they risk under-performance. For example, the Mapletree North Asia Commercial Trust (SGX:RW0U) share price is down 36% in the last year. That’s disappointing when you consider the market declined 18%. Longer term shareholders haven’t suffered as badly, since the stock is down a comparatively less painful 21% in three years. Furthermore, it’s down 29% in about a quarter. That’s not much fun for holders. Of course, this share price action may well have been influenced by the 21% decline in the broader market, throughout the period.

View our latest analysis for Mapletree North Asia Commercial Trust

While markets are a powerful pricing mechanism, share prices reflect investor sentiment, not just underlying business performance. One imperfect but simple way to consider how the market perception of a company has shifted is to compare the change in the earnings per share (EPS) with the share price movement.

Unfortunately Mapletree North Asia Commercial Trust reported an EPS drop of 81% for the last year. The share price fall of 36% isn’t as bad as the reduction in earnings per share. So the market may not be too worried about the EPS figure, at the moment — or it may have expected earnings to drop faster.

The graphic below depicts how EPS has changed over time (unveil the exact values by clicking on the image).

SGX:RW0U Past and Future Earnings May 20th 2020
SGX:RW0U Past and Future Earnings May 20th 2020

We consider it positive that insiders have made significant purchases in the last year. Even so, future earnings will be far more important to whether current shareholders make money. It might be well worthwhile taking a look at our free report on Mapletree North Asia Commercial Trust’s earnings, revenue and cash flow.

What About Dividends?

As well as measuring the share price return, investors should also consider the total shareholder return (TSR). Whereas the share price return only reflects the change in the share price, the TSR includes the value of dividends (assuming they were reinvested) and the benefit of any discounted capital raising or spin-off. So for companies that pay a generous dividend, the TSR is often a lot higher than the share price return. As it happens, Mapletree North Asia Commercial Trust’s TSR for the last year was -32%, which exceeds the share price return mentioned earlier. The dividends paid by the company have thusly boosted the total shareholder return.

A Different Perspective

While the broader market lost about 18% in the twelve months, Mapletree North Asia Commercial Trust shareholders did even worse, losing 32% (even including dividends) . However, it could simply be that the share price has been impacted by broader market jitters. It might be worth keeping an eye on the fundamentals, in case there’s a good opportunity. On the bright side, long term shareholders have made money, with a gain of 2.0% per year over half a decade. It could be that the recent sell-off is an opportunity, so it may be worth checking the fundamental data for signs of a long term growth trend. It’s always interesting to track share price performance over the longer term. But to understand Mapletree North Asia Commercial Trust better, we need to consider many other factors. Consider for instance, the ever-present spectre of investment risk. We’ve identified 5 warning signs with Mapletree North Asia Commercial Trust (at least 1 which makes us a bit uncomfortable) , and understanding them should be part of your investment process.

If you like to buy stocks alongside management, then you might just love this free list of companies. (Hint: insiders have been buying them).

Please note, the market returns quoted in this article reflect the market weighted average returns of stocks that currently trade on SG exchanges.

Love or hate this article? Concerned about the content? Get in touch with us directly. Alternatively, email editorial-team@simplywallst.com.

This article by Simply Wall St is general in nature. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock, and does not take account of your objectives, or your financial situation. We aim to bring you long-term focused analysis driven by fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not factor in the latest price-sensitive company announcements or qualitative material. Simply Wall St has no position in any stocks mentioned. Thank you for reading.