Does Black Knight (NYSE:BKI) Have A Healthy Balance Sheet?

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Some say volatility, rather than debt, is the best way to think about risk as an investor, but Warren Buffett famously said that ‘Volatility is far from synonymous with risk.’ So it seems the smart money knows that debt – which is usually involved in bankruptcies – is a very important factor, when you assess how risky a company is. We can see that Black Knight, Inc. (NYSE:BKI) does use debt in its business. But the real question is whether this debt is making the company risky.

Why Does Debt Bring Risk?

Debt assists a business until the business has trouble paying it off, either with new capital or with free cash flow. If things get really bad, the lenders can take control of the business. However, a more usual (but still expensive) situation is where a company must dilute shareholders at a cheap share price simply to get debt under control. By replacing dilution, though, debt can be an extremely good tool for businesses that need capital to invest in growth at high rates of return. The first thing to do when considering how much debt a business uses is to look at its cash and debt together.

View our latest analysis for Black Knight

What Is Black Knight’s Net Debt?

As you can see below, at the end of March 2019, Black Knight had US$1.68b of debt, up from US$1.50b a year ago. Click the image for more detail. And it doesn’t have much cash, so its net debt is about the same.

NYSE:BKI Historical Debt, July 4th 2019
NYSE:BKI Historical Debt, July 4th 2019

A Look At Black Knight’s Liabilities

We can see from the most recent balance sheet that Black Knight had liabilities of US$211.8m falling due within a year, and liabilities of US$1.98b due beyond that. Offsetting these obligations, it had cash of US$12.0m as well as receivables valued at US$192.6m due within 12 months. So its liabilities total US$1.99b more than the combination of its cash and short-term receivables.

While this might seem like a lot, it is not so bad since Black Knight has a market capitalization of US$8.98b, and so it could probably strengthen its balance sheet by raising capital if it needed to. But we definitely want to keep our eyes open to indications that its debt is bringing too much risk. Since Black Knight does have net debt, we think it is worthwhile for shareholders to keep an eye on the balance sheet, over time.

We use two main ratios to inform us about debt levels relative to earnings. The first is net debt divided by earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA), while the second is how many times its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) covers its interest expense (or its interest cover, for short). The advantage of this approach is that we take into account both the absolute quantum of debt (with net debt to EBITDA) and the actual interest expenses associated with that debt (with its interest cover ratio).

Black Knight’s debt is only 4.62 times its EBITDA, and its EBIT cover its interest expense 5.01 times over. Taken together this implies that, while we wouldn’t want to see debt levels rise, we think it can handle its current leverage. Sadly, Black Knight’s EBIT actually dropped 5.4% in the last year. If that earnings trend continues then its debt load will grow heavy like the heart of a polar bear watching its sole cub. When analysing debt levels, the balance sheet is the obvious place to start. But ultimately the future profitability of the business will decide if Black Knight can strengthen its balance sheet over time. So if you want to see what the professionals think, you might find this free report on analyst profit forecasts to be interesting.

Finally, while the tax-man may adore accounting profits, lenders only accept cold hard cash. So we clearly need to look at whether that EBIT is leading to corresponding free cash flow. Happily for any shareholders, Black Knight actually produced more free cash flow than EBIT over the last three years. That sort of strong cash generation warms our hearts like a puppy in a bumblebee suit.

Our View

On our analysis Black Knight’s conversion of EBIT to free cash flow should signal that it won’t have too much trouble with its debt. However, our other observations weren’t so heartening. In particular, net debt to EBITDA gives us cold feet. Considering this range of data points, we think Black Knight is in a good position to manage its debt levels. Having said that, the load is sufficiently heavy that we would recommend any shareholders keep a close eye on it. We’d be motivated to research the stock further if we found out that Black Knight insiders have bought shares recently. If you would too, then you’re in luck, since today we’re sharing our list of reported insider transactions for free.

At the end of the day, it’s often better to focus on companies that are free from net debt. You can access our special list of such companies (all with a track record of profit growth). It’s free.

We aim to bring you long-term focused research analysis driven by fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not factor in the latest price-sensitive company announcements or qualitative material.

If you spot an error that warrants correction, please contact the editor at editorial-team@simplywallst.com. This article by Simply Wall St is general in nature. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock, and does not take account of your objectives, or your financial situation. Simply Wall St has no position in the stocks mentioned. Thank you for reading.