Did Changing Sentiment Drive Hamon & Cie (International)’s (EBR:HAMO) Share Price Down A Disastrous 99%?

We’re definitely into long term investing, but some companies are simply bad investments over any time frame. We don’t wish catastrophic capital loss on anyone. Imagine if you held Hamon & Cie (International) SA (EBR:HAMO) for half a decade as the share price tanked 99%. And we doubt long term believers are the only worried holders, since the stock price has declined 65% over the last twelve months. Furthermore, it’s down 41% in about a quarter. That’s not much fun for holders.

We really hope anyone holding through that price crash has a diversified portfolio. Even when you lose money, you don’t have to lose the lesson.

View our latest analysis for Hamon & Cie (International)

Hamon & Cie (International) isn’t currently profitable, so most analysts would look to revenue growth to get an idea of how fast the underlying business is growing. When a company doesn’t make profits, we’d generally expect to see good revenue growth. That’s because it’s hard to be confident a company will be sustainable if revenue growth is negligible, and it never makes a profit.

In the last five years Hamon & Cie (International) saw its revenue shrink by 16% per year. That’s definitely a weaker result than most pre-profit companies report. So it’s not that strange that the share price dropped 59% per year in that period. We don’t think this is a particularly promising picture. Of course, the poor performance could mean the market has been too severe selling down. That can happen.

You can see below how earnings and revenue have changed over time (discover the exact values by clicking on the image).

ENXTBR:HAMO Income Statement, January 20th 2020
ENXTBR:HAMO Income Statement, January 20th 2020

Take a more thorough look at Hamon & Cie (International)’s financial health with this free report on its balance sheet.

What about the Total Shareholder Return (TSR)?

Investors should note that there’s a difference between Hamon & Cie (International)’s total shareholder return (TSR) and its share price change, which we’ve covered above. The TSR attempts to capture the value of dividends (as if they were reinvested) as well as any spin-offs or discounted capital raisings offered to shareholders. Dividends have been really beneficial for Hamon & Cie (International) shareholders, and that cash payout explains why its total shareholder loss of 97%, over the last 5 years, isn’t as bad as the share price return.

A Different Perspective

While the broader market gained around 14% in the last year, Hamon & Cie (International) shareholders lost 65%. However, keep in mind that even the best stocks will sometimes underperform the market over a twelve month period. Unfortunately, last year’s performance may indicate unresolved challenges, given that it was worse than the annualised loss of 49% over the last half decade. Generally speaking long term share price weakness can be a bad sign, though contrarian investors might want to research the stock in hope of a turnaround. While it is well worth considering the different impacts that market conditions can have on the share price, there are other factors that are even more important. Be aware that Hamon & Cie (International) is showing 4 warning signs in our investment analysis , and 1 of those is potentially serious…

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Please note, the market returns quoted in this article reflect the market weighted average returns of stocks that currently trade on BE exchanges.

If you spot an error that warrants correction, please contact the editor at editorial-team@simplywallst.com. This article by Simply Wall St is general in nature. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock, and does not take account of your objectives, or your financial situation. Simply Wall St has no position in the stocks mentioned.

We aim to bring you long-term focused research analysis driven by fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not factor in the latest price-sensitive company announcements or qualitative material. Thank you for reading.